We thought it might be useful to document the process of starting an online business from scratch. Jim Coudal and Steve Delahoyde will periodically post here about issues involving our product and business plan. Hopefully things will go well but even if the whole thing goes down in flames, it’ll probably be interesting to watch.

Subscribe to our RSS feed.



Jewelboxing Info

How to Make Multi-Page Cover Booklets

On a fairly regular basis, we get a call or an e-mail asking if the Jewelboxing system can handle multi-page cover booklets. The answer has always been a solid yes, and we walk the person through the ways you can accomplish that. Although we love talking to Jewelboxing users directly, we thought we'd streamline the whole process a little and make a definitive set of instructions available here on the blog. So we got Bryan here at HQ to spill the beans on how to make your own multi-page booklets:

"Our kits include paper templates to print a 4-page cover insert for each case (one sheet printed front and back then folded to make a cover, back cover, and an inside spread). The paper itself is pretty thick, so we recommend an 8- or 12-page booklet maximum or things could get a little too tight and somewhat difficult to insert and remove. If your plan is to make these multi-page booklets using only our paper, it's probably a wise idea to order extra sheets, so you're not left with more cases than paper."

"Alternately, if you do need more than 12 pages, our thick paper makes a nice 'cover' for lighter-paper pages of your own choosing (you can also trim those inside pages a little smaller to maximize that book cover effect). Since the cover insert designs for both our Kings and Standards are simple rectangles, you can use our software template to print on your own lighter paper to make these additional pages. Just be sure to include crop marks and fold marks so you know where to cut and fold."

"Whatever you decide on making, remember that your book must be a multiple of 4 pages. Be sure to design (and number) your pages in 'impositions' to ensure they're all in the right order when cut and folded." [You'll find a handy guide over to the right].

"Once all the pages are cut, folded, and collated, you can use a 'saddle stapler' to bind them. If you don't have a saddle stapler or the budget to procure one, try a copy shop. You can also arrange the booklet fold on the corner of an old phone book (they're good for something!). Just staple along the fold into the phone book, pull the booklet off of the phone book, and fold the staples together by hand. It's a little extra effort doing it that way, but you should end up with good results."

If you should happen to have any trouble along the way, don't hesitate to drop us a line or give us a call. We'd be more than happy to try and get everything back on track.

Now In Our Template Arsenal: iWork Pages

As a follow-up to that last post, we recently put Bryan to work in developing Jewelboxing templates for Apple's iWork Pages design program, and we're happy to announce that they're all finished up and available for download and use after making your Jewelboxing purchase. Although, like with the programs mentioned below in Design Software Alternatives, Pages doesn't wield a ton of design muscle, we'd received a number of requests for the templates to be made available for it and we think you'll find it'll work well for whatever you have planned. Here are some brief notes Bryan sent along about the new templates:

  • If you follow the included instructions, a user puts the files in the right folder and they'll show up automatically in the "templates" menu when you start to create a new file, which is kinda neat.
  • iWork is Mac-only and contains Pages, Keynote, and Numbers (analogous to Publisher, PowerPoint, and Excel). It costs $79, but there's a 30-day free trial
  • If you like working in iPhoto and iMovie, it's a particularly good choice because the interface is similar. If you use those programs, Pages will feel familiar.

A Touch Lighter, A Lot Better

We're nothing if not constant tinkerers around here. If you've been following this blog, you've probably noticed that, twice during the last three years, we've announced that we were rolling out new and improved paper stock. Today we're doing it again.

We've listened to our customers' requests for what they'd like to see improved and also have taken into consideration new printer technology. The old adage goes that you can't please all of the people all of the time, but if we can get that percentage running at around 99%, we figure we're doing pretty well.

Here's the rundown on what's new and improved:

* Our custom-milled paper is still a bright, solid stock that really holds ink well, as it always has, but we've made it a touch lighter (the old paper was 12 mil, while the new batch is 9.5 mil thick). This means it will feed more smoothly and through a wider variety of printers.

* We've vastly improved quality control. New dies and tighter tolerances have improved the paper's performance relative to the software templates, keeping it much more consistent, batch-to-batch. Also, the perforations are stronger and less prone to accidental separation, while remaining just as easy to punch out.

* The coating on the paper has been modified, making it less "dusty." This is a barely-noticeable change, but it's healthier for your printer, as less dust means less wear and tear on rollers and print heads.

These changes should be particularly helpful for users of color laser printers and finicky ink-jets. The new paper will feed and print better and minimize harmful dust residue (we still recommend using the manual feed tray -- keeping the paper path as simple as possible always helps).

We're hoping you'll find this new stock perfect for your next project. All King (DVD-sized) template paper shipped after May 1, 2007 will incorporate these features and our next batch of Standard (CD-sized) template paper will meet these specs, too. And, as always, we're eager to hear your thoughts about it, so feel free to drop us a line and let us know what you think.

A Quick Offer: if you'd like to give the new paper a try, just order a 20pack of Kings before the end of the day on Friday, May 11th and then drop a note to "papergeek at jewelboxing dot com" saying you did, and we'll send you a $10 instant rebate. Cha-ching.

From Our Studio, To Yours

Most often, our customers come to Jewelboxing with all their supplies ready to go. They just need the paper and the cases. But you'd be surprised how often we've gotten questions from the same person, who ask things like, "What kind of printer works best?" "Can you recommend a type of disc to use?" and "How do you guys apply disc labels without having them not line up properly?" The more we received these questions, both from people new to all of this and those experienced designers who suddenly found themselves in need of creating some eye-catching packaging, we got to thinking about some sort of all-inclusive kit. And thus, the Jewelboxing Studio was born.

The kit, which comes in three boxes, includes every single thing you'll need to make a run of 100 cases (except for a computer and design software, of course). There are 100 Jewelboxing King cases and trays, 120 custom-milled and coated trayliners and insert books (we throw that extra 20 in there, just in case you catch a typo or forget to put in a new ink cartridge), 120 disc labels, 100 super high-quality, completely textless Taiyo Yuden CD-Rs or DVD-Rs, 100 very strong corrugated disc mailers, 200 protective pads for mailing, 120 printable mailing labels, a disc applicator for perfect alignment, an example case with alignment templates included on the disc, which work with Photoshop, InDesign, and pretty much everything else. To top it off, also included is a Canon Pixma iP4200 Inkjet printer, with 2 extra sets of ink cartridges and a USB cable for quick setup. It's a big batch of stuff, to be sure.

The best thing about it all is that you're getting the materials that we use here at the studio. We've been embarrassed by discs we've burnt that didn't seem to play on a client's machine, but never by these by Taiyo Yuden. We've heard back from people who received a cracked case we sent them before we figured out the best method of shipping, using the included, very sturdy corrugated mailers and spongy pad thingamabobs. We've tried dozens of printers, and we've found that the Pixma works best with our paper, at a reasonable price. And now we all have one at our desks. So with the Jewelboxing Studio kit, not only are you getting everything you need for a project, you're also getting the benefit of these last couple of years of our own trial-and-error solutions.

Sure, the Studio won't be for everyone, but for those who need it, we think it'll be a terrific, immediate answer to a project that requires one-stop shopping, instead of spending the whole day searching around for all the components.

Here's to hoping there are studios are buzzing with all kinds of Jewelboxing activity in Columbus, Stanford, Toronto, Corvallis, Oakland, Burr Ridge, Kansas City, Culver City, Winston Salem, Chicago, Rolling Meadows, Webster Groves, Venice, Chislehurst, Torquay, Kalamazoo, Hopkins, Camarillo, Brooklyn, New York, Whistler, Reston, and Ferndale.

"Can you recommend a good way to ship my Jewelboxing case?"

We get this question at least a few times every week from people who want to make sure their hard work arrives as beautiful as it was when they put it together.

When we started Jewelboxing, we knew we were going to be sending out samples of the cases from time to time, so we needed to find a package that was not only cost-effective, inexpensive to ship, but also something that provided protection against the drops and bumps it would inevitably receive during its journey through the Postal System. After digging around a bit, trying different things out, we came up with two options:

The first is the Jiffy #2 Padded Mailer. It measures 8 1/2" x 12" which the perfect size for both cases, the Standards and Kings. We've found that they also hold two cases rather well too, which is great when we have send off a request for a sample of each. The only thing to remember is that if you do wind up sending two together, just make sure there's something between the cases, so they don't scuff each other during shipping.

The second option is the Self-Seal DVD Mailer. We tend to use this one for sending out international samples because it's made of corrugated cardboard and can take more of a beating. It, too, can hold two cases, but, again, we'd recommend adding some padding between them.

For that in-between padding, here at the studio we use 1/8" x 6" x 6" Foam Sheets, one placed on each side of the case in the mailer. This helps keep the case itself from moving around and also adds a bit more protection.

So there you have it, all the items we use to make sure the cases we send out arrive safe and sound. We've already caught wind that postal services the world over are in awe of the packages being sent out by those in Honolulu, Chesterland, New York, Pearcy, Miami, Venice, Harrisburg, Laguna Niguel, Anchorage, Chatsworth, Formby, Durham, Lancaster, Deer Park, Eastport, Saskatoon, London, Vancouver, Montreal, Phoenix, Chicago, Charleston, Brunswick, Malibu, Helsinki, and Stockholm.

Preferable Preforations

In the interest of always trying to provide the best possible product, we've recently revised the perforations on the paper that comes with each of our Jewelboxing kits. Last year, if you'll remember, we spent a couple of months testing out different stocks of high-quality paper options, and ultimately went with a superior, custom-milled stock that we found held ink better and would have more compatibility with nearly every kind of ink jet printer. This time around, we've returned to looking at our paper because we'd heard from a few customers that, when they were printing, most often on older ink jets, the occasional perforation on a sheet would catch and tear off (if you're not familiar with the system, that's not usually supposed to happen until after you're all done printing). So we took a look at the sheets, played around with some different ideas, and decided that it might be wise to have the paper layout re-cut, so the perforations weren't all the way out to the edges, and thus, less chance of accidental tearing.

That said, this paper with the new perforations started shipping out this month and we're really happy with the way it turned out. It's a slight alteration but we like to think it's the details that make the Jewelboxing system better than other options.

We're sure the benefits of these new cuts are being reaped in by the truckload by those in Vancouver, Chicago, Santa Monica, Minneapolis, Boston, Roanoke, Alexandria, New York, Los Angeles, Brooklyn, Saint Charles, San Francisco, Hagerstown, Baltimore, East Rutherford, Charlotte, Houston, Warren, Yellowknife, Astoria, Bainbridge Island, New Berlin, and Cocolalla.

The Sum of Its Parts

Inspired by this article about the individual parts of a compact disc on the great site, CoverTalk, we wanted to do a similar post, but about Jewelboxing. So we setup a lightbox in the conference room and roped in our resident photographer in the studio, Bryan, to zoom in and make everything look beautiful. And that he did. Maybe even too well. Once he passed the photos back over to us and saw how terrific they looked, we felt like maybe doing some long write-up might take away from these cool images. So that said, here's a little bit of writing on the various pieces, but remember that the emphasis is all on the pretty pictures.

Curved Case Corners One of the things that makes Jewelboxing so appealing are the perfectly rounded corners. Here you see non-hinge section of the case, with the tray insert, and the King booklet, not yet put in place.

The Paper The paper included is custom-milled and coated, specifically designed to be super-bright and work exceptionally well with consumer-grade, ink jet printers. Each sheet is double sided, so you're able to print all the interiors and exteriors with equal results. Here we see a trayliner sheet about to be put in.

Reinforced Hinges and Tray Inserts The Jewelboxing system's case consists of very sturdy plastic pieces. The hinges are reinforced, as you see from the shape in this photo. We're also seeing here a tray insert about to snapped into the case. We say "snapped" because when you press down on the tray, you'll hear it actually snap in, so you know it's secure.

Advanced Locking Clasp A problem with most casing systems is that they don't always stay securely fastened. Jewelboxing's Advanced Locking Clasp features two molded pieces on the top of the case that fit into two pieces on the bottom. Once they're locked together, the case is as sturdy as can be. And if you try to open it without reading the instructions ("Press" it says), you'll find it pretty difficult to crack it open.

Two-disc Hub We get calls every once in awhile from people like the look of Jewelboxing, but want something that can hold two discs. That's a great request, because we can immediately fulfill it. Jewelboxing cases, in both the Standard and King sizes, have a two-disc hub, which essentially means that it's twice the size of one found in a normal case, and stores two discs easily and safely, with plenty of distance between the two.

The SJB301/4-E Tab If you thought you were going to get all the way through a description of all the pieces of something without hearing a complicated number, here's where you're proved wrong. The tab, shown here, has a complex name, but performs a simple, but very effective task: holding the case's cover. The tabs are just slightly larger than those found on your typical case and thus, are much more secure and much easier to work with as you remove the printed cover to look at the liner notes.

We hope this inside look at Jewelboxing will be valuable to you in some way, or you've at least enjoyed Bryan's photos. We're certain that every nook and cranny has been memorized now by the people in Hamburg, Bacup, Brooklyn, Decatur, Chicago, Tempe, Seattle, Palo Alto, Halifax, Mountain View, McAllen, New York, Brookline, Vancouver, Ridgefield, San Francisco, London, Baltimore, Toronto, Boulder, Bloomington, Tucson, Omaha, Sausalito, Roseville, Washington, Ottawa, Colorado Springs, and Irvine.

Between a Little and a Lot

In response to several inquiries we thought we'd better update and repost this entry.

Our systems are great for smallish quantities of disc packages. Your ability to customize makes creating one-offs easy. Even 100 copies is no big deal. We've done 175 in an afternoon for one client's film and 300 for a friend's music-house reel and we have customers who have done as many as 500 by hand on a consumer-grade printer. We also have customers who have produced thousands of copies. Most of the time they use our super-precise templates to create the file that a print-shop uses to cut dies. It's a one-time cost of a couple hundred bucks and for a big run it works out great.

Lately though, we've had a number of inquiries from people who need to make 600-1000 packages and don't want to go through the trouble or cost of die-cutting. The best solution in that situation is to buy the cases in bulk and also the tray-liner paper. The tray-liner is a very complicated die-cut with rounded corners and scores for all the spines. And it needs to be perfect. Just run that pre-perfed paper through a sheet-fed printer and then have your replicator screen the art on the discs. The last piece is creating the insert books. It's a simple job for any print-shop as the die-cut for that is just a folded rectangle. Voila.

Bulk pricing for cases and paper starts at quantities of 600. Write us at the link above for a quote. If you need less than that but more than 200 we'll make you a deal. In general, we'll give you a 100pack free for each four you purchase. Just let us know what you need and we'll try to accomodate.

Thanks to Lubbock, NYC, Montclair, Wexford, Waikato, LA, Charlbury, Toronto, Vancouver, San Francisco, Thornhill, San Jose and Chattanooga.

A Good Decision, Verified

A company can't continue to grow without change. We made a big one a month ago when we decided to switch the paper stock we use with the Jewelboxing System. Sure, we were happy with what we'd used previously, but there's always room for improvement. So we tested and tested, and sure enough, we were right; there was a better stock out there for us. Now every Jewelboxing System we send out is packaged with it, and thus far it's getting great reactions. Take for example this message we just received from Joan McDonald:

"We wanted to tell you how phenomenal we found the new paper stock. We were totally unprepared for the difference it made. I just can't stress how different the same file came out printed on the new stuff, compared to the previous stock. We were blown away at the depth and vibrancy it delivered. We've been looking at copies of the same tray insert printed on both stock types, and still can't get over the enormous jump in quality from one to the other. It's hard to believe it's the same file. So, good going on investing in the milled-to-order template sheets; it was absolutely worth it, as it's now impossible to justify going with any other jewelboxing option if you care about how your project is going to present."

"We just wanted to let you know what a wow factor the jewelboxes added, and how we're itching to come up with other projects just so we can make more Jewelboxing cases. A deeply satisfying process, especially that clicking the pieces together moment when you're suddenly holding a finished case. Cool stuff."

We think it's impossible to justify going with anybody other than our new pals in Dallas, San Francisco, Houston, Roselle, San Diego, Stevensville, New York, London, Burbank, Irving, Austin, Flatrock, Miami, Norcross, Tacoma, Columbus, Seattle, Bloomfield, Berkley, Paris, Mississippi State, and Santiago.

Everything You've Always Wanted to Know About Jewelboxing And Weren't Afraid to Ask

With any product comes questions. We can speculate that when the telephone was invented, people asked questions like, "How do you plug it in?" or, "How do I telephone my friends?" or even, "Is there a tiny little person who sounds just like my cousin living in the receiver?" With Jewelboxing, it's no different.

Granted, the System is a breeze to use, from the pre-cut, high-quality paper, to the templates you can just drop into your favorite design program and start tinkering away, but we still do get some really pertinent, very valuable questions coming in. We'd compiled these questions into our helpful Frequently Asked Questions page, but since it's been a little while since its last update, we thought it was about time to include some of the newer questions we've gotten, as well as update some of the older ones with the enlightened bits of knowledge we've picked up along the way. While we were at it, we also thoroughly updated the Read Me info for those customers who are already using the System. Take a look. Of course we're always here if you need us, but maybe you'll see something in there that answers all your questions right away.

Along those lines, if you're a regular Jewelboxing user and have printer settings that you've found work exceptionally well with the System, we're in the process of compiling a list of printers and their best settings to further help out with the whole process. If you have any tips, please send them our way. We'd really appreciate it.

We're writing glowing, highly-complimentary FAQs about those in New York, San Francisco, Santa Cruz, Albuquerque, Baltimore, Katonah, Omaha, Commack, Seattle, Mexico City, Kirkland, Oakland Park, Sandston, Mountain View, Green Bay, and Cincinnati.

A Revolution, On Paper

It took us almost six months to get it just exactly right but we're happy to report that all Jewelboxing orders are now shipping with our new custom-milled and custom-coated paper. It performs incredibly well. Engineered to our specifications, it's a super-bright, 12mil 80# photo-matte stock that is coated on two sides and is optimized specifically for consumer-grade inkjet printers. Ink-spread is really minimal, allowing much greater detail than our previous paper and the richness of the color reproduction compares favorably with hi-gloss, super-premium photo paper.

It is virtually impossible to have a super glossy paper manufactured that is coated on both sides. More importantly, the photo finish tends to crack when folded. Both our insert-books and tray-liners are scored and need to be folded precisely for a perfectly-fitted final look. Our new paper provides photo quality reproduction while working within the requirements of the Jewelboxing assembly guidelines. Plus, the cases are beautiful and glossy-looking all by themselves.

As for the new paper working with laser-printers, our official policy is that it works best for ink-jet and conventional sheet-fed printing but weíve tested it on a number of lasers with great results (except that some lasers are picky about how heavy a paper stock they can take). The heatís not that big a deal but if you were doing hundred and hundreds of prints you might get some dusting from the coating that could concievably muck up the fuser. We havenít seen that in tests, but we suppose it could happen.

Anyhow, the production of this paper represents a major investment for us and a major improvement for our customers. For the first time, we've had to increase the prices of our kits slightly but we promise, you won't be disappointed with the increase in quality. If you're a current customer and would like to purchase a PaperPack to try out with the kit you have on hand, and we'll send you a link and a 'friends and family' discount too.

Things are looking brighter in Mount Laurel, Lindsay, LA, Denton, Mexico City, Monte Estoril, Grand Rapids, San Rafael, Torrance, Boston, Austin, San Francisco, Kettering and Carbondale.

Next to Perfection

Last week, Apple released both the Mac Mini and the iPod Shuffle, amazing little devices that not only have intuitive function, but look great while they're doing it. These releases reminded us that, more and more, people aren't just interested in having the latest technology, but they also want to integrate it into their lives. Much like couches and chairs, people don't want their computers, televisions, and media players to be big ugly boxes. Rather, they want them to blend into their homes, their offices, and their lives, in a harmonious way.

Yet it seems that people are still surrounding the well-crafted design of these flashy devices with clunky, ugly media and accessories. Think of how many standard DVD cases you have laying around your television, or look over at that lame paper disc sleeve next to your beautiful new Mac. Having that ho-hum packaging around your sleek high-tech gadgets throws the whole thing off balance. It's like buying a brand new Mercedes and putting up fuzzy dice and a "My Other Car is a Llama" bumper sticker. Well, 'round these parts, we think that's a real pity, and instead, we offer the perfect alternative: Jewelboxing cases look nice next to everything. They compliment good design because they follow good design principles. So why not maintain that balance, and keep those techie aesthetics high?

The sleekest and sexiest of them all reside in Williamsville, Medicine Hat, Markham, Vancouver, New York, Ann Arbor, Seattle, Tuscaloosa, East Dundee, and Urbana.

Over There

While the majority of the Jewelboxing packs we've sold have gone to buyers in the US and Canada, we've certainly gotten a healthy share of orders from outside our North America. A few of these customers abroad, over this past year, have talked with us about the expense of shipping a Jewelboxing kit internationally, wondering if it's worth it to pay those extra few bucks to get it shipped so very far away. Well, to that we say: of course!

Here's why:

Cheaper methods can take upwards of eight weeks to deliver and sometimes the stuff doesn't even arrive at all or arrives all bashed up. We're using the cheapest way to get product delivered in a reasonable time (usually 4-7 days) and track it on the way. Spend a couple of extra bucks on Jewelboxing and you'll receive the goods long before you've forgotten you ordered them.

And what difference are those extra bucks anyway? With the US Dollar falling further in value nearly every day, for the international customer, Jewelboxing keeps getting more and more affordable. What's bad for the buck is a big plus for Jewelboxing enthusiast abroad. So order today, foreign friends, and you'll be saving time, headaches, and you'll be giving us a few extra dollars -- ones we'll soon need wheelbarrows full of, so long as those geniuses over in Washington keep it up.

Thanks to those who know the value of a few well-spent dollars in Germantown, Mountain View, Aurora, Auckland, Downers Grove, Miami, New York, Gilbert, Cincinnati, Atlanta, Arlington, Astoria, London, Kirkland, San Diego, Los Angeles, Brooklyn, West Jordan, Washington, Kansas City, Mystic, Salem, Belleek, Saddle Brook, Hoffman Estates, Anchorage, Lachine, Mexico City, Toowoomba, Brightin, Lexington, and Seattle.

Three Apples A Day

Alex of o2 Creative Solutions writes, "We are in the process of developing packaging for a six disk set with a short booklet. I was wondering if you offered any multiple disks solutions?"

This issue has come up a few times and while we don't offer a single package that can handle that many discs we do have a couple ideas. First off, our King cases handle two discs beautifully. More than two discs involved? Coincidentally we're dealing with a similar assignment on a client project that we can't talk about. For the purposes of this discussion, let's say that a band named 'Eve' has asked us to design a package for a three CD album. One solution might be to use a single image spread across the spines of all three cases. When they're stacked or shelved next to each other, they display a nice unified look from the side. The next step would be to spec out a custom, cardboard sleeve to hold all three cases (basically a folded rectangle glued to itself) and then repeat that same image on the side panel of that. Voila. If you need the specific dimensions for the sleeve, or have another solution you'd like to share, just drop us a line.

Our gratitude never ends and neither does our feeble attempt to get caught up on these. Here's to all our pals in San Francisco, NYC, Gilbert, Lake Oswego, Washington, Scottsdale, Seattle, Canton, Fernandina Beach, Keller, Edmonton, Philadelphia, San Angelo, Rochester, West Hollywood, Malibu, Mount Laurel and Port Royal.



Completely Complete Introducing The new Jewelboxing Studio


Categories:

Advertising + Promotion
Art Projects
Case Studies
City Thanks
Education
Faith-Based
Films
Holidays
Jewelboxing Info
Jewelboxing Internal
Miscellaneous
Motion Graphics + Animation
Music
Personal Projects
Photography
Press
Tips
Typography
Web + Software
Weddings

Case Studies:

1. Impactist
2. WOXY.com
3. Rafael Macho
4. Heavenspot Studios
5. Eyeball NYC
6. twothousandstrong
7. 451
8. Bigstar
9. Marcel Duchamp
10. FontShop
11. Alex Gould
12. Hephaestus
13. John Caserta
14. EveryBaby
15. Ben Saunders
16. SetBuild Project

Most Popular Entries:

Making JB Comps in P'Shop
Case Studies
How To Ship Finished Cases
Dawson's How To Video
A Paper Revolution
What a Mom Made
One Thing Leads to Another
How To Be a Hero
Salami Sandwich
Eternal Damnation
Bags of Air
Between a Little and a Lot
Sweat Shop Book Club
The Whole Studio

Previous 12 Entries:

Birds of a Feather Design Together
A Long Hike for a Great Cause
'Tis the Season for Seasons Past
"Something of Substance"
It's All the Talk in Delray Beach
A Walk Through Wedding Season
Important News for the Home Brewer and the Thirsty: Our Disc Labels Find a Valuable New Use
Coming Soon: An Exciting New Pack and Ship Experience
Picture Perfect
Now Available in Belarusian
The Power of a Good Valentine's Mix Disc
Well Taught

The Whole Enchilada:

Listing of all the entries

Thanks For Noticing:

37signals
9 Rules
A List Apart
A Penny For
Airbag
Alert But Not Alarmed
Analogue
Angie Mckaig
Anil Dash
Ascent Stage
BD4D
BeatnikPad
Blog of the Day
Brainwerks
Brown Glasses
Byrdhouse
Card House
The Cartoonist
Codex
Cool Hunting
Core 77
Cover Talk
Design is Kinky
Dreamorphans
dwsn
Fiatvera
File Me Away
Footblog
Gapers Block
Global Spin
Grand Text Auto
Green Cine Daily
Greg
GreenSouth
Hello Friend
I Feed You
Inkblots
IT Enquirer
K10k
The Life and Times of Sooz
Linkdup
Living With Music
Lomblad
Loop – Behind the Scenes
Magnetbox
Marusin
MDN Sutudio
Meltoni
Mike Sloane
Mirandala
Moleskinerie
MongoSlam
Nervous Music
Newstoday
Nicole Muddled
Now Hear This!
Paul Mayne
The Red Ferret Journal
Retro Thang
Ruelog
The Sachs Report
Sarah Hatter
Sevitz
Simple Bits
Snowdeal
Styleboost
Stylespion
Superflous Banter
Superneedle
Surfstation
Swikiri
textilesounds
Things Magazine
This Boy Is Toast
Tick Tock Design
Tirade
Un-Square Dance
VMUNIX Blues
Warwicka
weBraning
What Do I Know
Wishingline
WizWow
Y2KM
Yewknee
Zeldman
Zoetrope 101

Weblog powered by Movable Type. Of course.