“Something of Substance”

When it comes to photography, Toronto-based Jessica Blaine is a jack of all trades, master of all. When not expertly and creatively shooting events and portraits, she runs an online shop where she sells prints she’s made from shots she’s taken with her Holga, operates a studio in one of the creative hearts of the city, and diligently chronicles her work and life on her blog. It would be enough just knowing that there’s cool people like Jessica out there doing great work, but we get the extra perk of being able to help her out of the packaging side, being as she’s long been a Jewelboxing user. She was very kind in dropping us a note about her work, as well as her experiences using our cases. Here’s from Jessica:

“I am a full-time photographer located in Toronto, Canada who has been shooting professionally for eight years. I photograph all things people, whether it be weddings, babies, families, corporate events or editorial for magazines. I love photographing people and cannot imagine doing anything else in my life. Nothing beats seeing the expression on my clients’ faces when they receive their images knowing that I captured all of the special little moments for them. As photographers we have an important job as we document all of the milestones in others’ lives.”

“One of my favourite vendors that I have worked with throughout my career is Jewelboxing. Often the only product that my clients receive from me is a disc with images and I wanted to make sure that when I give it to them that it is something of substance. I looked everywhere for the perfect product before I found Jewelboxing. I love the customization that I am able to do with every disc case that I print. I also love that as I photograph the same family over time they begin to have a collection of my matching discs on their shelf.”

Thanks a million to Jessica for being a customer and for sharing her story with us. And here’s to hoping there’s lots more great work going on in Vancouver, Bedford, Charlotte, Minneapolis, Roseville, Portland, New York, Oceanside, Alameda, Crownsville, Bethel, Appleton, Fayetteville, Kerhonkson, West Hollywood, Washington DC, Miami, South Pasadena, Bude, Kilkeel, Bryan, the Bronx, St. Paul, Toronto, and Grand Rapids.

Picture Perfect

Bay Area-based Alison Yin is not just a spectacular photographer, but she’s also a stellar blogger. For the past two years, she’s been writing about her experiences shooting fine art, documentary subjects, engagements, weddings, and anything else she can point a camera at and make look lovely. And lovely the accompanying photos are, often making great use of the wide, expansive space provided by the wilds of California or incorporating the immediate surroundings in clever and interesting ways. As we’re an office filled with a handful of aspiring, amateur photographers, Alison takes the sort of photos we aspire to one day capture ourselves (she’s maddeningly good with an external flash, whereas we’re still getting the hang of it). All that praise now dished out, we were thrilled to find that she had recently posted some images of the Jewelboxing cases she designed for an engagement she’d photographed. Like the rest of her work, it’s terrific. And we’re very happy to have been involved in her process.

Thanks very much to Alison for letting us use the photo of her case and here’s to hoping that people and things are being as nicely lit and captured in Berryton, Sunland, New York, Hidalgo, Los Angeles, Holladay, Turlock, Sherman Oaks, Oceanside, West Monroe, Venice, Hollywood, Pittsburgh, Appleton, Hebron, Manor, Savannah, San Diego, Rochester, Bedford, Waco, Knoxville, Van Nuys, Portland, Saint Martinville, South Pasadena, Camas, Columbia, and Port Washington.

Well-Crafted Accompaniment

Alex Gould, who we profiled for Case Study 11 about his documentary An Interview with James Jarvis has put together what looks like another great film and another terrific case design. The Organist tells the story of cinema organist Dave Nicholas, who has played along with motion pictures at the Liverpool Philharmonic Hall Cinema for twenty years, as well as church services for an additional ten years. Here’s the trailer for the film: Continue reading

Better Than an SAT Prep Course?

We know we shouldn’t get big heads and that overt proudness is unbecoming, but sometimes it’s easy to feel pretty pleased with ourselves around here, particularly when we get letters like this one from Mason Sklar:

“I know it’s been way too long, but I really want to thank you guys for inventing Jewelboxing. Unfortunately, I only made one copy of my disk, which a college admissions guy may or may not still have and while the contents of the disk are at my site, I have no documentation of it actually existing.”

“But! The good new is that said college admissions guy was impressed with my portfolio, especially the presentation of it (that’s you guys). I got an acceptance letter from this school (which was my first choice) two weeks later, as well as a scholarship, and I’m sitting in their dorms procrastinating right now. So thanks for being awesome. High fives all around.”

So can we therefor infer that use of Jewelboxing is a sure-fire way of getting into your top pick for college? Well, it’s verifiably worked at least once before, so maybe that’s enough to start including in any promotional materials we print up.

Big thanks and congrats all around to Mason. And here’s to hoping palaces of higher learning are taking a close look at our customers in Minneapolis, New York, Boston, Columbus, Costa Mesa, Petaluma, Santa Monica, Vestal, Birmingham, Fortville, Loveland, Honolulu, Roy, Sunbury, Danbury, Kirtland, Brooklyn, and White Rock.

Case Study 14: EveryBaby

We get a little weak in the knees every time we run across someone using Jewelboxing for some form of entrepreneurial outlet. Maybe it’s because it reminds us a little of ourselves from way back when, launching a new company and hoping people would like what we were offering. So maybe it’s a little like that movie Pay It Forward but not nearly as schmaltzy and definitely without that kid from The Sixth Sense. Whatever the case, we were fortunate to get to talk to Jennifer Diaz, founder of the design firm Force Nine, about her recent foray into the great unknown that is a product launch, a sort of “build your own baby book” collection of forms for season scrapbookers and the uninitiated alike called EveryBaby. We were so enjoying talking to Jennifer and the uniqueness of her product that we thought “Hey, we should do a Case Study about this!” and thus, here we are.

1. Can you tell us a about yourself?

I went to design school in the early 1980s, when everything was still done by hand. I was always drawn to the history of art and design as well and my master’s thesis, in modern art history, was a comparison of several early twentieth-century graphic designers. I worked for a short time at the Getty Trust in Los Angeles, where I lived with an illuminated manuscripts scholar, grew to love artists’ books, learned basic bookbinding skills, and began writing for Print and other design magazines. All of this is relevant to the EveryBaby book project in one way or another.

2. What’s the EveryBaby Memory Book Pages project?

EveryBaby pages are PDF-formatted components for building customized memory books. What is unique about the EveryBaby system is that you print only the pages that you select, in the quantities that you need, on your choice of paper. You can then bind the pages in any number of ways, along with additional photographs, documents and other memorabilia.

3. What inspired you to create it? Making books for your own children? Some other product out there that you thought just wasn’t quite doing everything?

I started seriously thinking about creating a flexible baby book system when my sister adopted her then nearly 2-year old son. Around the same time, her gay neighbors adopted two children, a never-married sister had a child, and a friend became pregnant through a sperm bank. I was also doing pro-bono design work for a group dedicated to kids with cerebral palsy, who each had their own individualized lists of developmental milestones. Nearly all of the baby books available were hopelessly inadequate for all of these families, and it occurred to me that it was almost insulting to expect these parents to slice up traditional books.

I also had my own daughter eight years ago and settled on a baby book with little John Lennon animal drawings. The pages were so shiny that I had to use a Sharpie to fill in the data and there never seemed to be space for the type of information that I wanted to record, such as details of her many music classes, mysterious allergic reactions, and four years of preschool.

4. Did you design all of the 160 PDFs the package comes with? How long did that take you?

The entire process took about seven years, which has actually turned out to be a good thing. By shelving the project for months at a time, I was able to re-imagine it several times. Initially, I had planned to offset print and package the pages by chapter and sell them to retail shops via the big NY trade shows, with a start-up cost of about $16,000. It took some time (years, in fact) to realize that I would still not be addressing the fundamental issue, which is the ability to choose one page at a time while assembling a book. While I was endlessly contemplating all of this, the PDF file format became more mainstream and Etsy was launched, leading me to develop a much more comprehensive and economical product than I could have conceived of seven years earlier.

I chose many of the actual page design elements fairly early in the process, however, including Engraver�s Bold, Aldus, Bickham Script and Lo-Type for text, plus an assortment of dingbats and ornaments for borders. I probably ran 20 laser and inkjet-printer tests on the dashed lines alone.

5. Did you have some sort of system developed for how you thought each form should be organized? It’s a ton of information to keep track of, so it seems like you’d need to think out the flow of each page, to make it accessible.

During the first few years, I worked on the text in Word. This enabled me to really focus on grouping information into pages that could be opted out of as a unit. I didn’t even begin designing the chapters until I had locked in the precise contents of each page. The most difficult section was probably the “firsts,” which are usually just a long laundry list in conventional baby books. I separated them into logical, Montessori-ish classifications, such as Practical Life, Communication, Fine Motor Skills, etc., and left room for anecdotes and lists where appropriate. When I finally started laying out the pages in InDesign, it was fairly easy going, but I still continued to edit. During the final phase, I hired a professional copy-editor/proofreader to read through the entire collection of pages.

6. Speaking as someone who has absolutely no experience with this, once a person has the disc and they’ve been printing their pages and putting everything together, do you have any recommendations on how to assemble a great baby book?

The best, and least stressful, approach is to assemble several books. For example, the pregnancy, birth and adoption sections have a finite timeframe, so they can be printed, completed and bound first. The “All About You” section will take many years to compile and should therefore have a dedicated box for the storage of calendars, notes, and scraps of information. Alternately, a four-page birthday party section can be filled in during the party and added to a birthdays-only book. At an early age, kids can take over filling out their own pages for the school memory book — and in case of disaster, the pages can be reprinted. The family tree and parents� sections are probably the lowest priority for overwhelmed parents, but can be an easy weekend project at any point over the years, and are easily duplicated for each child�s individual book. Finally, as the overriding goal of any memory book is a long shelf life, I highly recommend the museum-quality storage boxes, sleeves and binders available from Light Impressions.

7. Although I’ve gotten better over the years after countless moves and getting tired of hauling boxes around, I come from a long line of hoarders of stuff that holds sentimental value. So for people like me, do you think having something more organized and guided like your printable sheets will help? Any advice on what’s good to keep and what’s best to just toss?

I think all artists and creative people are hoarders. The trick is to hoard in a semi-organized fashion and then allow the passage of time to dictate what can be tossed. One of my most memorable experiences at the Getty was getting a first look at boxes of Jan Tschichold’s personal papers, which had just been purchased but not yet catalogued. Despite all his rules about the organization of the page, Tschichold’s personal files were a fantastic mess of personal letters, sketches and printed ephemera from virtually every significant designer. He clearly saved everything, but items were fairly well sorted into folders and boxes. The Getty staff took his efforts one step further by slipping things into archival sleeves and entering critical dates and information into accessible databases. This is essentially what parents do when assembling memory books. It’s an organic process – and the EveryBaby pages give you a framework in which to document that process.

8. In an age where a lot of the memories you keep are now online, from photos to home movies, there’s something very comforting about printing things, filling them out with a pen, attaching photos, etc. What is it about getting to work with these bits and pieces of memory by hand?

Most early art, even on cave walls and papyrus, was associated with personal memories. Illuminated manuscripts were basically scrapbooks, with groups of unrelated pages bound together, family members painted into biblical scenes, and personal notes scribbled in the margins. There’s a tactile component to the process of assembling memorablilia that is an essential part of the human experience. Technology is not only at odds with this experience, but even worse, can pose a real threat to it. In fact, I’ll bet 10 Syquest cartridges that the technology on which your digital photos and videos are now stored will be obsolete within 20 years. With hand-compiled memory books, there is the potential to create something more enduring than a web gallery.

9. You’d mentioned earlier your choice to sell EveryBaby on Etsy. Why did you decide to go that specific route? Possible other options for the future?

Etsy is a great marketplace for anything made by hand. It’s an online craft fair – with some of the awfulness that craft fairs can inspire – but at the same time, it’s a high-end gallery of beautiful art objects. As a seller, I can’t imagine a marketplace that would better target the full range of alternative families, while also allowing me to shirk the responsibility of building my own web site. Like many artisans who launch on Etsy, I hope to evolve into selling on my own site or in retail shops, such as the Paper Source.

10. Why did you choose Jewelboxing as your packaging? And can you tell us a little about the your design for the case?

I chose Jewelboxing because I wanted a case that would be durable and elegant enough to be presented as a gift. The EveryBaby cases were designed to look like hand-bound books, with kraft paper covers, bookcloth spines, and endpapers patterned with Hoefler ornaments. The Jewelboxing inserts allow space for a huge amount of information on the back, and I used all sides of the booklet for instructions and an extensive table of contents. I will also add loose beads, baby bracelets and birthday candles to the spines as little surprise gifts for buyers.

11. What’s next for you? For the EveryBaby project?

As part of a self-imposed hiatus from client-directed projects, I’m going to spend the summer creating hand-bound binders, clipboards and folders to sell alongside the EveryBaby disks.

Case Study 13: John Caserta

A lot of times when we’re hunting around on the internet for Jewelboxing projects we can talk about, we stumble across a real gem. Other times, not only do we stumble, but we fall head over heels for. Such was the case with John Caserta’s packaging work for artist Tim Hyde. We loved it right off the bat, but as soon as we started looking at the rest of John’s work, we were bowled over and that voice kicked in: “This has to be a Case Study.” Fortunately, John, an information designer, teacher, and the founder of The Design Office in Providence, Rhode Island, was up for talking, which resulted in this great interview:

Can you tell us about yourself?

Might be best to refer you to my bio online. I don’t have (m)any memorable hobbies and interests like spelunking, sky diving or the like. I’m from North Carolina…and do love my pulled pork. I am a citizen of Italy, have lived there on occasion, and spent some time overseas in Cambodia. Married, dog, baby on the way. I was hooked into design and photography by my aunt. An odd lady who was an architectural photographer in the 40s and 50s and gave me a Pentax K1000 when I turned 15. She gave me her old Apple IIc in 1982 or so. I learned BASIC and had a lot of fun printing patterns on my Imagewriter. It took me until 1991 to buy my own Mac Classic. She willed me a bunch of her great old cameras when she died five years ago.

What’s The Design Office?

The Design Office was realized when I decided to move my practice outside a room in my home in 2007. Rent in Providence is relatively cheap and I found a gorgeous space downtown that I thought other designers would like. It’s a great place to be all day long. There are four spots and we do have four people working here. It’s part organization, part collective. Everyone pays dues to help the organization pay for itself and to give out mini-grants to designers who need a bit of help. I use The D.O. as the imprint for my larger (and collaborative) projects and products. We discuss, share, and create uncommissioned works under the name, too.

With the Rhode Island School of Design right there, are most of the people who use the space students, faculty, etc? Anyone from outside the school?

The other three folks are not affiliated with RISD. One went to Brown a few years back. The other came up from New York recently. The other is from Boston, but has lived here for years. I meet with students here, graduate students also work with/for me. Faculty do come by. It’s a block and a half from the department.

What led you to created the space? Was there a specific lack of resources in town? Or you wanted someplace to exist outside of the school?

It wasn’t so much that there was a lack of resources, but that I was accumulating equipment (and methods) that could easily serve others. The best example is when I bought a 24″ Epson 7800 printer for a project. I kept asking photographers to come use it…but it was at my house. Now, folks can come in for a few hours, or days, and complete a body of work.

Now I have an incentive to invest in additional resources: binding systems, rototrim, guillotine, books, digital equipment.

How do you make the Office function financially, with things like rent and keeping the lights turned on? Commissions, grants, donations, or through your store?

The Office is financially a break-even situation. I have resisted moving it to a non-profit, and resisted making it too revenue focused also. I have considered expansion to accommodate folks who want community and equipment more than a permanent workspace. This would bring in more money, but it’s more risk. I suppose I like as much of my time to go toward making work, so I’m skeptical of decisions that would take me away from that.

Since the mission is to support freelance designers, I’ve kept the dues very low. They’ll likely go up to allow for additional investments, project funds, and mini-grants. All utilities and toner and paper come out of the dues. Always plenty of money for those essentials.

We create products to fund the Office as well. Obama t-shirts, COFFEE/TEA mugs, etc. The products are also part of our work.

I also use the Office as a write-off for my design business (which I market under my own name).

I do apply for grants and they are a big part of how I see projects getting done.

I solicit galleries to sponsor projects. For instance, the parking lot painting project. It requires a site and it makes sense that a gallery would promote it like they might any installation. I’ve worked with three galleries, but we have not been able to get it produced, yet.

Any projects that have been created at The Design Office that you’re particularly proud of or enamored by?

Hobo 2010 is really resonating with a lot of people. It’s playful, funny, and revealing. It’s about design, observation, and community, among other things. It’s a call for photographs of the typeface Hobo in use.

There are quite a few conceptual projects on our group projects page. I am excited about all of them, and believe they will all get done in time. They require the right people, sites and/or funds.

Our most recent project: Letterboxes, is a nice combination of visual research (academic) and functional design. It has a mass appeal. It was a bear to produce (we had a custom box die made)…and we only made a couple hundred to start.

Back to you personally, you’ve been working in information design online since that early period in the mid-to-late 90s when the public at large was first really finding out about the internet. What are some of the biggest changes you’ve seen since then, within information design?

Information design feels very techy and cold to me now. Data-rich web visualizations are treated with too much authority. It’s easy to be seduced into thinking that there must be truth in the presentation of quantitative data.

Information comes from somewhere in the service of someone. The presentation of such should be more honest about that. The computer’s voice is more prominent than the author’s. What this means is that there is a certain faux-objectivity that the information carries.

Information design often relies on symbols — however it can just as easily rely on video, photographs, voice. This is when the honesty and humanity comes in.

For me, it was always about play. Allow the viewer to venture into the information and discover the complexity of a situation. There was certainly a great deal of naivete in the pre-Flash 5 visualization work.

I designed a touch screen kiosk displaying the information of all U.S. soldiers buried overseas. Four of these 15″ screen were installed next to each other at the Normandy American Visitor’s Center. Instead of listing the results in a chart (label: result), or using visualization techniques (when the soldier died relative to others), we created a sentence from the data. It effectively made a miniature obituary from the database. This felt appropriate given the delivery and subject matter of the project. Additionally, the only color that appeared on the screen was the background color. The background color shifted slightly with each touch of the screen. Noticeable only after about ten touches, the hues represented each soldier listed in the database. A simple tip of the hat for each of them. It also kept the information in black and white: often all that’s needed for information design.

When do you think that information design functions at its best?

Professor Lev Manovich wrote in The Language of New Media(end of Web 1.0 in 2001) that database and narrative are ‘natural enemies.’ The former categorizes information well, but does not offer an order, and the latter is order from seemingly unconnected information.

Information design can side with either of the above. And I believe best when narrative (subjectivity and authorship) is foregrounded. Because more and more information is held within a database or will be disseminated through a database, most projects take on the look of database. The data is displayed either spatially, or color-coded, or what have you. This often brings attention to the quantity of information, and not what it could tell us if edited or organized more carefully.

Take the example of a book of photographs that I assigned my students to edit. There are 8 students who each photographed 20 images over 3 months in 5 cities. There was no specific directive; it was an editing exercise.

What I saw was the database’s influence on the editing process. The students ordered the book by either location, student, color, time, f-stop, or other pre-existing categories. They perceived the photographs as data objects, with their meta data as content. When the meta-date is the order, the narrative becomes random, a bi-product of how and where the data was acquired. However the project lies not in the quantifiable information (where, when, who…), but the student’s ability to weave together the pieces into an unexpected story. These are the projects we remember and that is something a database cannot do.

A lot of your early background was working with big outlets, like the New York Times, the Tribune, and NBC. In your bio, you’ve said in you still have a stable of clients, but you’re also doing all of this work with The Design Office and your role at RISD, so are your normal days split up more toward these creative or academic pursuits or split fairly evenly? Any goals to make either/or your primary focus?

I see my life split into thirds: RISD (teaching, advising), The Design Office (art/design making), and client work. I’d like the first two to generate the last. “I like how you think” is a great thing to hear. And ideally after that, “I have a great project for you.”

Providence life really affords a more self-driven creative life. Less overhead than bigger cities and fewer dramatic clients. I primarily work with Brown University and with a three-person company that generates automated graphics for large media companies (that I am part-owner of).

We first landed on your site after seeing your work for artist Tim Hyde and the Max Protetch Gallery. Can you tell us about Tim and his work?

Tim is an old friend from San Francisco. He moved back to New York to attend the graduate program in art at Columbia. He produced a rich body of photography work there. Max Protetch pulled him in right away as one of their artists and he has gone on to produce video and installation works with them. I love how he sees and how he thinks. His work is sincere…very human. That is a really rare trait in the Chelsea art scene. He has a solo show coming up at the Philadelphia Art Museum.

The cases you put together for both his videos are just beautiful. Can you tell us anything about designing them?

I started the project by looking for a solid and authoritative DVD case. I felt it was important that the case itself was substantial when art dealers, collectors and museums buy Tim’s videos. It needed the weight of a $10,000 purchase (or however much they are). So when The Museum of Modern Art purchases one of Tim’s videos, they are handed this case. In fact, the buyer receives two disks (in one case). One is for exhibit, the other for archiving.

I used Trade Gothic condensed because it matched the proportions of the disk. His Bus Passengers piece really works well opened up because the video is a series of portraits where you often see one person in front of the other.

It’s always a pleasure to design work for something I believe in and love.

What’s next for you? Any big projects you have coming up or something with The Design Office?

We just finished a prototype for a kids toy. Cardboard boxes with geometric shapes that assemble into giant letterforms. And there is a typeface with it. We’re looking for someone to produce it.

I suppose I am working on other projects that are not on the website. Because my wife and I are expecting a baby in May, I have been thinking of graphic toys: puzzles, blocks, books, mobiles and the like. That is how the cardboard boxes came to life. It is not clear how many of these will simply be for the home, but hopefully the better ones we can document as prototypes.

There are several other products that we could start work on soon, but I’d like to see some of the group projects get completed. There’s quite a bit on our site that you see is ‘in progress.’ All of those projects need some pushing.

And finally, how is it having John Maeda as your new boss at RISD?

It hasn’t made a huge impact on our department quite yet. Unfortunately he has been bogged down in the financial crisis. His belief in conversation and innovation is beginning to take hold — initially through blogs and large flatpanel info screens.

There are many of us who are quite excited about how some of the Media Lab models might penetrate the culture here — particularly a more research oriented approach.

Documenting Good Design

Over the last couple of days, we’ve been talking with LA-based photographer, Brandon Moreles about a project he recently finished up using Jewelboxing. As is often the case (pun!), we were introduced to Brandon’s work when he sent over a photo of his project, all dressed up extra fancy in a set of Jewelboxing kings. His cover really impressed the whole lot of us, as did the interior. And when he sent over some links to his work, that sealed the deal. Here’s Brandon’s scoop on the project:

“I’m a photographer based out of California particularly keen on long term documentary projects. This one, titled ‘LA DANZA’ is a documentary project on Native American dancers shot over the last few years throughout California. I chose Jewelboxing for this project mainly because most of the DVDs were going to a lot of different people I shot over the years and the king cases gave then that slightly more sleek, stand-out, professional look you don’t see often enough in packaging.

You’ll quite often find that sleek, stand-out, professional look among the fine people in Moorestown, Menlo Park, New York, St. Augustine, Encinitas, Needham, Dallas, Irvine, San Francisco, Newtownabbey, St. Louis, Seattle, Chicago, Honolulu, Washington, Brooklyn, Crystal Lake, Pompano Beach, Elmont, Bend, Mississauga, Atlanta, Coronado, Irvington, San Juan, Basingstoke, Monroe, Potomac, Vancouver, Nashua, Venice, Schaumburg, Perth, and Burnaby.

The 2005 Olympics in Seattle

‘Round Jewelboxing HQ, we’re always happy to catch wind of a cool project someone has decided to package using the system.Today was one of those days, as we received an e-mail from Jason Reid, a filmmaker from Seattle who has a bunch of said cool projects going on, most notably, the new film, “The Reid/Secrest Olympics.” The DVD release party was held on September 30th and turned out to be very successful. And because Jason has some great things to say about using Jewelboxing, including that his Canon Ip4000 printer did a perfecto job, and that we’re a fan of what he put together, we thought we’d volley back the niceness and give some info about his film:

“The Reid/Secrest Olympics is a 40-minute comedy, directed by Jason Reid. It tells the story of two lifelong friends turned fierce rivals, who decide to have a five-event “Olympic” competition to decide once and for all who is the better man. The film was finished in 2003 and premiered to a sellout crowd at the Tractor Tavern in Ballard. Following this event, the film was shown three times at the University of Washington before being accepted into the New York Independent Film and Video Festival (where it screened in both New York and Los Angeles).Since then, Jason Reid and editor Colin White have slowly been working on finishing the DVD, complete with over an hour of extra features. Among the bonus materials, the DVD will include a 30-minute companion piece to the movie titled The Olympics: The Untold Story , as well as a comical 10-minute short documenting the main character’s promotional tour in support of the film.”

Sounds like a sure-fire hit to us. Do yourself a favor and, when they’re available here in the next little while, buy a copy at the film’s site. And while you’re at it, why not pick up a few extras for the swell people in San Anselmo, Chislehurst, Bodoe, Acton, Atlanta, New York, Chicago, Vancouver, Irvine, Venice, and Statesboro.

Impressive Design, Oppressive Regimes

A little while ago, Jacob Patton, Director of Outreach and Technology for the Free the Slaves organization, stopped by the studio to say hello and to drop off a copy of his group’s new project, “The Freedom Relay,” beautifully designed and packaged using Jewelboxing. We were so impressed by both the design and the goals of the foundation, we thought we’d highlight both the case and give some information about the project: Continue reading

Slightly Colder Than Even Chicago

We absolutely love it when we get a letter like this one sent in recently by Sini Salminen, Art Director at Supernova Design & Advertising in Anchorage, Alasksa. Not only is her project, “Asveq – The Walrus Hunt,” interesting and incredibly unique, but she also provided the icing on the cake by packaging it all with Jewelboxing. Sini tells us… Continue reading

Our Life in Pictures

We asked for a Mom or Dad with design skills to write us a note if they’d like to try our system free of charge and document the creative and production process. Andrea Buchanan, author of “Mother Shock: Loving Every (Other) Minute of It” (Seal Press, 2003) and managing editor of LiteraryMama.com, an online literary magazine, answered our call. Here’s Andi’s account of completing a run of photo CD’s to be given as gifts. Continue reading

Wanted: One Mom or Dad With Design Skills

Here’s the deal. We’d like someone to produce a Christmas present with Jewelboxing and document the process for us. In exchange we’ll send you the materials to do it free of charge. Write us at crew at jewelboxing dot com and tell us why you think you should be considered. Continue reading

Connecting Architecture Students

We’ve sponsored a fair amount of communities and projects during the past ten months but none that we’re more excited about than Archinect’s School Blog Program. Paul and company have “recruited representatives from a collection of architecture programs around the world to maintain blogs documenting their experiences and discoveries from each institution during the fall 2004 semester.” Continue reading