From Our Studio, To Yours

Most often, our customers come to Jewelboxing with all their supplies ready to go. They just need the paper and the cases. But you’d be surprised how often we’ve gotten questions from the same person, who ask things like, “What kind of printer works best?” “Can you recommend a type of disc to use?” and “How do you guys apply disc labels without having them not line up properly?” The more we received these questions, both from people new to all of this and those experienced designers who suddenly found themselves in need of creating some eye-catching packaging, we got to thinking about some sort of all-inclusive kit. And thus, the Jewelboxing Studio was born.

The kit, which comes in three boxes, includes every single thing you’ll need to make a run of 100 cases (except for a computer and design software, of course). There are 100 Jewelboxing King cases and trays, 120 custom-milled and coated trayliners and insert books (we throw that extra 20 in there, just in case you catch a typo or forget to put in a new ink cartridge), 120 disc labels, 100 super high-quality, completely textless Taiyo Yuden CD-Rs or DVD-Rs, 100 very strong corrugated disc mailers, 200 protective pads for mailing, 120 printable mailing labels, a disc applicator for perfect alignment, an example case with alignment templates included on the disc, which work with Photoshop, InDesign, and pretty much everything else. To top it off, also included is a Canon Pixma iP4200 Inkjet printer, with 2 extra sets of ink cartridges and a USB cable for quick setup. It’s a big batch of stuff, to be sure.

The best thing about it all is that you’re getting the materials that we use here at the studio. We’ve been embarrassed by discs we’ve burnt that didn’t seem to play on a client’s machine, but never by these by Taiyo Yuden. We’ve heard back from people who received a cracked case we sent them before we figured out the best method of shipping, using the included, very sturdy corrugated mailers and spongy pad thingamabobs. We’ve tried dozens of printers, and we’ve found that the Pixma works best with our paper, at a reasonable price. And now we all have one at our desks. So with the Jewelboxing Studio kit, not only are you getting everything you need for a project, you’re also getting the benefit of these last couple of years of our own trial-and-error solutions.

Sure, the Studio won’t be for everyone, but for those who need it, we think it’ll be a terrific, immediate answer to a project that requires one-stop shopping, instead of spending the whole day searching around for all the components.

Here’s to hoping there are studios are buzzing with all kinds of Jewelboxing activity in Columbus, Stanford, Toronto, Corvallis, Oakland, Burr Ridge, Kansas City, Culver City, Winston Salem, Chicago, Rolling Meadows, Webster Groves, Venice, Chislehurst, Torquay, Kalamazoo, Hopkins, Camarillo, Brooklyn, New York, Whistler, Reston, and Ferndale.

A Can’t Miss Multi-Level Packaging Opportunity

Because we think it’s every person’s destiny to own just as many boats, cars, and tropical isle dream homes as we do, we’ve been thinking here at Jewelboxing HQ about how we can help you maximize your potential and create just enough synergy to explode your current revenue dynamics and live your dreams by earning as much as $70,000 per month with only an hour of work per week, tops. We’re still not entirely finished with this exciting profitability opportunity, so in the interim (and while you save the $299 we’ll be asking for as an initial startup fee), we thought we’d share a note from filmmaker Byword Smith about how he’s putting our King cases to great use with his latest project:

“I’m a stand-up comedian and filmmaker out of Washington, DC. I just produced a comedy short called Hopes and Schemes, which is about a man who gets caught up in a unique “business” opportunity that he hopes will help him reach his dream, but ends up taking him further away.”

Hopes and Schemeswas a two year process for me. Working in multiple areas of the digital film production process was mandatory if I wanted to articulate the vision I had for the story, and also make a great product along the way. I found out about Jewelboxing years ago through a friend and knew that if I ever created a dvd, I’d consider those cases.”

“The reason I chose Jewelboxing over other DVD cases was because I want to stand out as a filmmaker and make a memorable first impression to people when they get my film. I want people to say to themselves, “I want this!” I’ve already received many compliments on the cases. What I also love about Jewelboxing is the all-in-one setup that’s provided; between the templates and the perforated paper, my house is a one-stop shop for DVD creation!”

Thanks a million to Byword for dropping us a line (here’s the Hopes and Schemes trailer) and here’s to hoping hard work is being one-stop shopped in Edmonton, Glendale, Toronto, St. Catharines, Clovis, Minneapolis, Dallas, San Francisco, Virginia Beach, Goleta, Tucson, Santa Rosa, Benbrook, Meriden, Brooklyn, Spokane, Mission Viejo, Janesville, Portland, Huntington Beach, Odessa, Quebec City, Vestal, Honolulu, Phillipsburg, Lomond, Welland, and Panama City.

Breaking the Chains of Unreleased Soundtracks

Used to be that you were at the mercy of studios, distributors, and big retailers. But now with things like iTunes, inexpensive media, and ahem, Jewelboxing, if you want something that isn’t available or doesn’t exist, there’s no reason not to just make it yourself. We saw that back in June of last year when Raymond Forbes decided he wanted to make his perfect David Cronenberg box set. Now we see it again with Phillip Chee, who wanted the soundtrack for the film One Week, but it had never come out. So he just wrote down the tracks listed in the credits, download the songs (and “added a second set of tracks from the artists on the play list to fill up the disc”) and there you go, instant album. And definitely much more attractive than something you would have bought at the store.

Thanks to Phillip for sharing the photos of his great creation on Flickr (if his name sounds familiar, we’ve also featured him on our blog before) and here’s to all those taking charge of their soundtrack and box set needs in San Francisco, Palm Harbor, Perth, Venice, Villenuve D’Ascq, Biscarrosse, Bilbao, Preston, Southampton, Ashford, Raleigh, Washington D.C., Vail, New York, Singapore, Ben Lomond, Ozone Park, Brooklyn, Santa Monica, and Lewisville.

The Sweet Shine of Success

When you decide to throw caution to the wind and open up your own business, one of the questions that likely tugs at you in those first few months is “How am I going to stand out?” In creative fields, the first answer of course, should always be “talent.” But there are also all those other factors that help guide a business toward becoming successful, most notably, its appearance. It’s why we started Jewelboxing in the first place, because we wanted the work we were proud of at Coudal to stand out and figured a lot of people probably felt the same way as we did about the usual packaging options out there. Fortunately, we’ve found that plenty of people did, including wedding photographer Cheyenne Schultz, who wrote in to tell us why she chose to use Jewelboxing almost immediately:

“We started our business here in Charlotte, NC less than two years ago, having shot our first wedding in the fall of 2007. Since then, we have grown quite a bit and will be shooting 27 weddings this year. We do shoot the occasional family/baby session, but since weddings are what we love, we devote 95% of our time and energy to advancing that part of the business.”

“When we first started, we used a very nice, quality case to deliver the portrait session/wedding day files on disc to our clients. However, it was much too traditional for our tastes and a pretty generic product that didn’t fit our business brand. As a company with a clean, bright style and a modern approach to shooting, the basic black leather cases just weren’t cutting it and we knew it. We needed something that would reflect US. When I came across a Jewelboxing sample on another photographer’s blog, I knew I had found what we had been looking for and immediately placed an order.”

“For us, branding is everything. From the first Jewelboxing case we designed, we knew it fit in with our brand and would showcase our work in a way that made us proud. One of the core values of our business is to provide excellent quality in all aspects and that definitely includes the products we offer. In Jewelboxing, we found just that; a product that has helped to take our branding to the level and has contributed to the success of our business. We’re hooked and haven’t looked back.”

Thanks to Cheyene for sharing her work with us and here’s to hoping brands are thriving in Houston, Los Angeles, Daly City, Washington DC, Annapolis, Santa Monica, Schaumburg, Malmoe, Douglas, Purchase, Manchester, Venice, Minneapolis, Brooklyn, Zufikon, South Haven, Santa Maria, Anchorage, Quesnel, Palatine, Chesterfield, Calgary, Lapel, Brighton, and Reston.

Unstoppable

We love seeing a young designer who just gets it and Liam Vasey definitely fits into that category. Not only is his work clever and confident, not plagued with heavy handed tricks or overcompensation for having just recently graduated, but he also understands the importance of getting out there and immediately impressing anyone and everyone who receives his great self-promo portfolio kit. Entitled “Liam Vasey Creates Design + Motion Graphics Under the Alias halfPlane and There is Nothing You Can Do to Stop Him,” it’s a handsome, bound book that shows off Liam’s work in print while a disc, beautifully packaged in one of our King cases, highlights his motion and web work. It’s a fantastic package, we’re sure he’ll be swimming in work because of it, and we feel very fortunate that he chose us to be a part of it. Here’s from Liam: Continue reading

Making a Good Last Impression

On our blog, it seems like many of our posts about promotional work tend to focus more on that first meeting, that attempt at landing a job. But we ran into an interesting discussion today about the other side of that equation over at the Freelance Switch Forums. The topic was “Packaging of Deliverables” and the initial post was about using Jewelboxing to turn in that final copy to your client of whatever it is you’ve just finished up for them:

Seems like an interesting way to leave a definite, tangible impression with clients. Has anyone else tried this? How did it turn out?

Personally speaking, it’s what we’ve always done here at Jewelboxing and over at Coudal, trying to make a good last impression, and we’ve found that it’s been a success thus far. Though there are, of course, some detractors:

Impressing your clients AFTER the project is complete seems to be a tad backward.

Granted, among those couple of “why would you want to do that?” responses there were some good points, largely stemming from the idea that not all businesses operate in the same way and sometimes a client just needs a file passed along by e-mail or FTP and that’s it. Impressing them at the beginning and sticking to their guidelines at the end might be just enough.

But the vast majority of the replies seemed to see this as a very good idea, continuing that commitment to the project even after the last invoice has gone out. If it’s right for your business and your marketing budget will allow for it, why not make an effort to keep those clients you’ve enjoyed working with coming back and possibly sticking solely with you for the long haul? That seems to be the verdict in the end, that while doing this might not make an instant financial difference to your business, putting the notion that “you’re a class act” in your client’s mind is never a bad idea and has the potential to lead to a lot of positives.

Just something we found interesting on a Friday afternoon and it’s always nice to see our cases discussed from another angle. Here’s to hoping for a great weekend and many happy returns in Fairfax, Austin, Bethesda, Villa Park, Shaker Heights, Media, Greenville, Brookline, Philadelphia, Oberlin, Mississauga, Sycamore, Chicago, South Grafton, Savannah, London, Winter Park, New York City, Vancouver, La Mirada, and Knoxville.

On the Topic of Police Officers and Bicycles

We’re big fans of the Byrd brothers, Aaron and Kevin. If you’re a regular Coudal reader, you’ve probably seen a lot of “via”s back to Byrdhouse, or links to some of their various projects and even right here on the Jewelboxing blog, like highlighting their film The Cycle Theory. So it was with great happiness that they decided to use Jewelboxing again to package their latest project, the delightfully absurd music video, Cops on Bikes. Here’s from the two of them:

On the project itself: “The video footage for Cops on Bikes was shot on a Sony still camera set to the ‘mpeg video’ option. We were hoping for a digital low-rent quality HD-Cams have trouble capturing. The stop animation stills were shot on a Canon 30D using 2 lenses, a 24-105mm and a crappy stereo lens. The slides are from Kevin’s analog collection. Aaron edited the video with Final Cut Pro. Kevin did some too. Aaron is Thriller 2.”

On using Jewelboxing: “We made the video with Jewelboxing in mind and knew the pictures and type treatment from the video and website would translate nicely. We went for an exploratory aspect with the case: all type on the outside, picture goodness on the inside to provide a nice contrast for one who opens it for the first time.”

“We thought it’d be nice to include headshots of the castmembers inside the dvd case usisng the photographic stills we used in the video. It was really exciting to see the media stretch across all platforms especially when transferring to something as slick as Jewelboxing.”

Kevin and Aaron were also kind enough to provide us with additional quotes, should we need them for this post, each of which we would feel sad if the world didn’t get a chance to read, so here they are:

From Aaron:
“Jewelboxing goes great with my beard, so I try to carry it around as an accessory whenever possible.”
“Girls tend to notice when you’re designing with Jewelboxing.”
“Where are the jewels? What a bunch of bull$%#*.”

From Kevin:
“I threw one at traffic once and it didnt break.”
“We sell them out our trunk at football games.”
“Aaron’s beard is real nice. I’m a lil’ jealous. I think Jewelboxing has done well for him.”

If that doesn’t sell you on the quality of the cases, nothing will. Thanks much to the Byrds for writing in and here’s to hoping that similar beard-related successes are being had in Alexandria, Brooklyn, Los Angeles, Sherman Oaks, New York, Boston, Ketchum, Durham, Lorton, Salt Lake City, Aliso Viejo, Edmonton, White Plains, Brampton, Lisle, Birmingham, Butler, Stanford, Basingstoke, Atlanta and Honolulu.

Every Nook and Cranny

We have a soft spot for people who use the spines of Jewelboxing cases. Among a whole slew of miscellaneous objects, we’ve seen pieces of wood, ball bearings, confetti and mini glow sticks. If you visit our FAQ page about the system, you’ll even see an illustration we put together warning that, while the spine is good for putting most anything, things like milk or fire ants probably aren’t such a good idea. So it was a case of case-love-at-first-sight when Megan Rucker a designer at the University of Texas at Austin told us about a project she and her colleagues recently put together:

“A coworker on our graphics team was leaving and we wanted to give him something. We all submitted a song or two for his going away CD.”

“I used Jewelboxing after reading about it from someplace cool. I can’t remember where now, but one of the cool kids out on the internets was talking ’bout it. I was impressed after visiting Jewelboxing website — it looked easy enough and I enjoy designing for these types of things. Once I received the box from you, the fun began. It was a very enjoyable project and made even easier with Jewelboxing templates (because I’m pretty lame at lining stuff up to print out right).”

“I put the twigs in the spine after I saw an example on your website of someone putting something in there — oh yeah, it was M&Ms;, I think. Andy is a nature kind of guy and it seemed appropriate. Although later, another coworker said she could think of something he likes even more and that would fit in there nicely too. Ha!”

Let’s hope there’s lots of random things being trimmed, controlled substances or otherwise, to fit just right in Chicago, Reston, Stonington (which we refuse to make an immediate callback joke about), New York, Fresno, Hagerstown, Newbury Park, Bayville, Toronto, Los Angeles, Knoxville, Loomis, Peterborough, Washington DC, Woodstock, Charlotte, San Francisco, Worcester, Santa Monica, Bethesda, Shakopee, St. Valentin and Copenhagen.

A Nice Conversation With An Angry Bovine

We heard from Jewelboxing user Jay Ferracane this week when he sent us a message saying:

“I ordered some kings from you guys a while back and finally got a chance to use them. I’ve been sharing a lot of recent work with these very memorable pieces. Everyone asked, ‘Did you do all this from scratch?’ to which I replied, ‘Well, with a little help…(insert Jewelboxing plug here).’ Anyway I was able to get a very custom look with off the shelf templates and parts. Thanks!”

Well, we thought that was about as great an e-mail from a user we were ever going to get, so we wrote back to Jay right away and asked if he could send over some info on himself. Here was his response:

“I’m a creative director in Los Altos, California and Angry+Bovine is my portfolio site. Bovine, specializes in helping companies create brands that take complicated ideas and make them tangible, engaging and understood. It’s truly multi-media, as the work is reflective of environment, print, web and brand strategies. The Jewelboxing system allowed me to make a custom high impact piece that I can leave behind with every client. They love the fact that what gets shown in the portfolio is now left with them to troll through at their own speed.”

Here’s to hoping we have more conversations like this one with the people in Warsaw, Olive Branch, Chicago, Edison, Old Lyme, San Diego, Spotslyvania, Denver, Vancouver, New York, Morgan Hill, Burbank, Boston, Atlanta, San Francisco, Winston-Salem, Toronto, Skokie, Gresham, Elmhurst, Ithaca, and Rockville.

The Sum of Its Parts

Inspired by this article about the individual parts of a compact disc on the great site, CoverTalk, we wanted to do a similar post, but about Jewelboxing. So we setup a lightbox in the conference room and roped in our resident photographer in the studio, Bryan, to zoom in and make everything look beautiful. And that he did. Maybe even too well. Once he passed the photos back over to us and saw how terrific they looked, we felt like maybe doing some long write-up might take away from these cool images. So that said, here’s a little bit of writing on the various pieces, but remember that the emphasis is all on the pretty pictures.

Curved Case Corners One of the things that makes Jewelboxing so appealing are the perfectly rounded corners. Here you see non-hinge section of the case, with the tray insert, and the King booklet, not yet put in place.

 

 

The Paper The paper included is custom-milled and coated, specifically designed to be super-bright and work exceptionally well with consumer-grade, ink jet printers. Each sheet is double sided, so you’re able to print all the interiors and exteriors with equal results. Here we see a trayliner sheet about to be put in.

 

 

Reinforced Hinges and Tray Inserts The Jewelboxing system’s case consists of very sturdy plastic pieces. The hinges are reinforced, as you see from the shape in this photo. We’re also seeing here a tray insert about to snapped into the case. We say “snapped” because when you press down on the tray, you’ll hear it actually snap in, so you know it’s secure.

 

 

 

 

Advanced Locking Clasp A problem with most casing systems is that they don’t always stay securely fastened. Jewelboxing’s Advanced LockingClasp features two molded pieces on the top of the case that fit into two pieces on the bottom. Once they’re locked together, the case is as sturdy as can be. And if you try to open it without reading the instructions (“Press” it says), you’ll find it pretty difficult to crack it open.

 

 

Two-disc Hub We get calls every once in awhile from people like the look of Jewelboxing, but want something that can hold two discs. That’s a great request, because we can immediately fulfill it. Jewelboxing cases, in both the Standard and King sizes, have a two-disc hub, which essentially means that it’s twice the size of one found in a normal case, and stores two discs easily and safely, with plenty of distance between the two.

 

 

The SJB301/4-E Tab If you thought you were going to get all the way through a description of all the pieces of something without hearing a complicated number, here’s where you’re proved wrong. The tab, shown here, has a complex name, but performs a simple, but very effective task: holding the case’s cover. The tabs are just slightly larger than those found on your typical case and thus, are much more secure and much easier to work with as you remove the printed cover to look at the liner notes.

We hope this inside look at Jewelboxing will be valuable to you in some way, or you’ve at least enjoyed Bryan’s photos. We’re certain that every nook and cranny has been memorized now by the people in Hamburg, Bacup, Brooklyn, Decatur, Chicago, Tempe, Seattle, Palo Alto, Halifax, Mountain View, McAllen, New York, Brookline, Vancouver, Ridgefield, San Francisco, London, Baltimore, Toronto, Boulder, Bloomington, Tucson, Omaha, Sausalito, Roseville, Washington, Ottawa, Colorado Springs, and Irvine.

Unabashed Hedonism, Really Cool Design

When poking around on Technorati one day, looking to see if we could find out if someone was talking about using Jewelboxing in some interesting project, we ran across Squad Studios. Although the mention was vague (“We are thrilled to be using new jewel boxes for this project”), based off the work showcased on their site, and a client list with everyone from Madonna to Warner Brothers, we knew whatever it was would be cool. Continue reading

Two Discs, One Case

We’ve received several letters recently about what to do if you want to use the Jewelboxing System, but have a project that requires more than one disc. Would you have to use more than one case? Would you need to switch over and use an unsightly alternative? The answer to both is a resolute no. Both the king and standard-size Jewelboxing cases have actually had the ability to store two discs all along!

Instead of using a separate, swivel tray inside the cases, which we’ve always found to be a little clumsy and not at all sturdy, we decided to go with our current system wherein two discs can fit snugly, and safely, atop one another. The disc-holding spindle in the center is larger than those within the alternative cases you’ve probably seen, making two discs sit close together, but far enough apart not to scratch and damage one another. Plus, we think it look a whole heck of a lot better than anything else out there.

Not convinced unless you can see it with your own two eyes? Well, here’s a little video we made a while ago showing this whole cool two-disc process.

We’d need at least two discs to hold all the positive things we’d like to write about the people in New York, Santiago, Hollywood, Deerfield Beach, Sausalito, Vancouver, Milwaukee, Chicago, Indianapolis, St. Louis, San Francisco, Coeur d’Alene, Atlanta, Chesterfield, Lakeland, Saskatoon, Brooklyn, Santa Monica, Los Angeles, Broken Arrow, and Venice.

FOJBs (Friends of Jewelboxing)

See that series of links over there to the right? Under the heading “Thanks for Noticing”? If you’ve never clicked around over there, that’s where we put the links to those who have talked up Jewelboxing on their blogs, their business sites, their personal projects; anything we find or are sent that gives the system a thumbs up. We’ve covered some of the comments and projects here on the blog or in Examples + Inspirations, but a lot of the shorter blurbs we’ve seen have just been tucked away over there in that growing list. So, to avoid neglect, we thought we’d pull a batch of the good ones out and show ’em off a bit.

“A CD / DVD presentation system, or the perfect online business plan. I think it’s great.”
– Rebel One

“…they are everything they are reported to be.”
– Superneedle

“Now this is cool as sh*t!”
– Y2KM

“..an imaginative new approach to CD-case design.”
– Now Hear This!

“I always like it when someone gets fed up with what’s currently available and invents a better version of it.”
– VMUNIX Blues

“I plan to send my electronic portfolio with my grad school application out in this. It seems like a fantastic addition to a job application too.”
– Muddled.Org

“Kudos to Coudal. Highly recommended.”
– Ascent Stage

“If you have a project, portfolio, or anything else that needs to look more impressive than a slimline case that you’d throw in your bag, I recommend Jewelboxing cases.”
– Steinruck Design

“With the increase of digital media tools on home computers, there has been a gap to fill the way to package that content in a profesional manner from home. Jewelboxing looks to be a great product to do so.”
– Put Together Quickly

“Finally, something for those of us who care to put a little more love in the package.”
– Josh Rubin’s Cool Hunting

“I, as well as others I know are despertally looking for an excuse to fork over the cash for these.”
– Ordinary Life

We’d be more than happy to lend our finest of blurbs to those in Brooklyn, Southbury, Edmonton, New York, Saint George, Gent, Loganville, Richmond, San Francisco, Toronto, Austin, Missoula, Coral Gables, Alta Loma, Potomac, Madison, Ardmore via Youghal, and Orlando.

Now in Exciting…Monochrome?

Because we’re in the business, we try to keep tabs on what else is out there in the disc packaging market. One thing we’ve heard a lot about, as you probably have too, is Lightscribe, developed by Hewlitt-Packard. It’s an admitted cool system where you’re able to burn an image straight onto a disc. It’s a method that’s been used by the big disc manufactures for years, but now the price of the technology has come down enough to make it a viable option for consumers.

In looking at all the info we could find on Lightscribe, reading up on how the laser works, at what image resolution it can burn, and other techie interests, we were more than a little disappointed when we saw samples of the discs. Given the limitations of the laser, black, and shades thereof, is the only color available to anyone who uses the system. The sample included in their press kit makes “Vacation in Hawaii” look dated and, frankly, a little dreary. You can imagine that the original picture they used was filled with vibrant blues and greens; the kinds of colors you’d remember from a trip like this. Shouldn’t you have something that immediately catches your eye, something that doesn’t require you to look past the old-timey monochrome?

Now while the Jewelboxing System doesn’t have any flashy, futuristic lasers at its disposal, we think the final output is a hundred times better. You get full color discs and a snazzy case to stick it in too. And the only piece of technology needed? A color printer.

But heck, despite our little concerns about it, we still think this Lightscribe thing is pretty cool. So even if you have one, you’re inevitably going to want to stick it in something nice, aren’t you?

There’s nothing dull and dreary about those in Abbeville, Saint Peter, North Chatham, San Francisco, Galena Park, Nashville, St. Louis, Spruce Pine, Newton, Walnut Creek, Valencia, Springfield, Surrey, New York, Winnipeg, Tucson, Elgin, Atlanta, Mexico City, McLean, Denver, South Windsor, Norwalk, Eden, and Boston.

We’re Being Completely Open With You

Outside of the tech world, we’ve been hearing more and more buzz about open source media and technologies. For example, on Monday’s “Morning Edition,” NPR ran this story about the Brazilian government choosing open source, Linux-based machines over those running Microsoft Windows. No doubt you’ve also heard the buzz about the cool open source Firefox browser. And what about Archive.Org, filled to the brim with copyright-free media? Continue reading

Chuck Darwin, Media Maven

We’re re-running this post because we’re putting together our Q105 media planning and could use some suggestions.

Here’s some details about the next phase of Jewelboxing. At Coudal Partners, we are frequently in a position to recommend various advertising vehicles and outlets to our clients. To do this we research as many possibilities as time and budget will allow. Next, we generally contact each one that seems like a good fit, lay out the basics of our program and ask them for costs and ideas. In essence, we ask them to pitch us specifically on why Magazine X or Radio Station Y should be included in the buy. After that we draft a plan and present it to the client, adjust accordingly and go ahead.

We’re doing a similar thing here. We’re contacting a fairly large number of online sites whose audiences would seem to intersect with ours and are asking them if they’d be willing to run a pilot program for us in December and/or January. The program would be purchased and we’ll leave it mostly up to the sites to construct and organize the placement specifics. We’ve set a maximum dollar amount for each pilot and if a site feels that this amount is too low we’re putting them on a “maybe later” shelf. If they do agree, we will be evaluating traffic and purchases that come from that site with an eye towards expanding our commitment with those who perform best. The real-time nature and easy tracking of online advertising allows us to be Darwinian in our approach. We’ll build a roster of partners based on performance and may or may not get back to the “maybe later” shelf as things progress.

If you run or know of a place on the web where people who might be interested in Jewelboxing congregate, send a note to jim at jewelboxing dot com and we’ll take a look. On a side note, you’d be surp

 

rised at how many sites who profess to be actively looking for advertising and sponsorship don’t respond to email inquiries promptly. You’d be even more surprised at some of the ones who don’t respond at all. Really, you would. We’re building another shelf for them. It’s the “probably never” shelf.

The fittest have survived in Savannah, Toronto, Marietta, Phoenix, Edmond, London, Cleveland, NYC, Miami, Hendersonville and San Diego.