Blood, Sweat and Day-Long Renders

Between the lot of us here at Jewelboxing, we’ve worked on our fair share of animated projects, from putting together work for clients to carefully moving characters with our kids, frame by frame, in making yet another stop-motion Lego Star Wars epic. So we’d like to think that we understand animation and how much time, dedication and effort it takes. And because of that, when someone like Tommy Baldwin chooses to package his animation portfolio in Jewelboxing, we feel pretty honored that he’d entrust his years-in-the-making work within our cases. Here’s from Tommy:

“Well the project is a animation reel slash interactive portfolio that I have been working on for almost 2 years. It’s a simple narrative that displays my skills as an artist and an animator. The entire project from character development, to 3D modeling, texturing and animation was all done by me.”

“Originally I was only going to put the film on my site, but when I was finishing up the project a fellow coworker and designer told me about Jewelboxing. After poking around the site for awhile and seeing all the amazing results, I instantly knew that this was another way to show off my film and artwork. The layered design of the case really appealed to my 3D imagination. I loved that there was an empty chamber in the binder. I really thought about what to put in there before settling on a piece of copper with a common design element hammered into it. Another aspect of the case that I loved was all the visual space that I could fill up with my designs.”

“Most of all, in the world of animation, every book is judged by it’s cover, and I think that my cover really shows off what’s inside the case.”

Here’s to hoping everything is behaving as it should between every keyframe in New York, Edmond, Santa Cruz, Universal City, Hartford, Orlando, Roslyn, Tervuren, Alexandria, Troy Grove, San Francisco, Austin, Seattle, Milltown, Long Beach, O’Fallon, Brooklyn, Richmond, Corte Madera, Vancouver, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia and Edison.

November 12, 2017 | Category: Blog

Case Study 10: FontShop

With the release of the documentary Helvetica last year came not just a fine film, but the chance for thousands of people to have that rare opportunity to share their love of typography together, out in public no less, and to even drag a few friends along in an attempt to finally prove why type is so interesting. Stephen Coles of FontShop and Typographica (and everywhere else on the web), was one person who needed no convincing. Likely a fan of typography since birth, he lives and breathes x-heights and descenders. We were very fortunate to get the chance to talk with him about the release of FontShop’s newFontStars 2007: Best Type of the Year collection, which was beautifully packaged in Jewelboxing Standard cases.

Can you tell us a little bit about yourself and about FontShop?

Design legends Erik Spiekermann and Neville Brody founded FontShop in 1990, when the digital fonts were just starting to replace older technologies as the standard for typography. Other retailers have cropped up since then, but FontShop has always set themselves apart with their European aesthetic and rebellious attitude. I was honored when the company invited me in 2004 to join their San Francisco office. As a designer and writer, I have a hand in a lot of the visual and textual image of FontShop.com.

What about your other world, outside of FontShop, at Typographica. How did that get started? And do you do anything other than think and write about type?

My partner in bloggery, Joshua Lurie-Terrell, founded Typographica in 2002 as a sort of informal lounge in which to chat about type. Since then, it’s become more of a venue for long articles about new fonts and typography.

I also think and write about furniture of the ’60s at The Mid-Century Modernist

Before we get too far into this, and in the interest of helping even just one reader so they use the right definitions, what’s the difference between a typeface and a font?

Over the years, the two terms have become confused, but I’m on a crusade to reverse that. My main ammo will be this concise clarification by the astute type designer Mark Simonson: “The physical embodiment of letters, numbers, symbols, etc. is a font. When referring to the design of the collection (the way it looks) you call it a typeface.”

Part of your bio says, “Stephen is currently dating Motter Fermina after breaking off a long and passionate affair with FF Strada.” We found it funny to see someone else talking about type in that way because we do that same thing around here all the time. So what is it about typography that you think makes you/us swoon?

I’ve always been fascinated about the details of everyday life that escape the active attention or conscious scrutiny of the general public. This is type. Its subtle power influences everyone and they rarely realize it.

This is likely a touchy subject in your business, but because FontShop deals primarily in an all-electronic medium, how do you go about dealing with illegal file sharing? Theft seems like it deals in levels of respect, in some degree, so while someone might not feel any guilt, say downloading a Matchbox 20 album, they’ll still go out and spend money on the new Radiohead, because they respect them more. So lengthy tangent aside, is that something that FontShop tries to stay on top of by being helpful and knowledgeable and, in general, but perhaps most importantly, just coming across as a cool company that people want to support?

You will never stop piracy. But those who actually use fonts professionally soon realize that the advice and tech support that comes with a license is as valuable as the fonts themselves. Our expertise is worth the price of the font.

Of course, we also find that designers buy fonts because they respect the work of their colleagues. They believe type designers should be paid for their efforts just like they expect to be paid.

Can you tell us about the FontStars 2007: Best Type of the Year collection? How did you go about picking your favorites of the year?

Like a mediocre album, most font collections tend to have a couple of hits stuffed in with a bunch of duds. We found that even though the price-per-font is lower, designers don’t spring for these compilations because they simply won’t use most of the fonts on the CD. FontStars is unique in that every typeface is new and they aren’t limited to a single foundry. This gave us a lot more flexibility to choose the best new stuff. We made sure it was versatile and practical by throwing in more than one style of each text face and a broad range of display goodies that will meet most needs.

In short, we started by asking ourselves what new fonts we would most likely want to see in our font menu at the beginning of any project.

If you’re at liberty to say without hurting any feelings, were there any that you left out that just didn’t quite make the cut?

There were a lot of great releases last year. Our regret is that we couldn’t include more, but we wanted to keep the price down so it wasn’t out of the reach of smaller studios.

Any font that you’re particularly fond of in the collection? Have you used it for something recently and, if so, what for?

Buxom, old-timey scripts are huge right now, and I don’t think anyone has captured that era of retro jersey and cookie tin lettering as well as Leslie Cabarga with his Casey. It even comes with a set of the underline swashes that were so common in baseball logos of yore.

You’ve packaged FontStars in a Jewelboxing Standard case. Why did you decide to package it using Jewelboxing?

Being a font seller, we’re accustomed to digital goods. We never have to deal with inventory or storage. Using Jewelboxing cases allows us to produce each CD as its sold without sacrificing our professional image.

Any comments you have about the process of putting the cases together, from the design to their assembly?

Separating the perforations on a finished print is just so damn satisfying.

Finally, what’s in store in the world of typography for 2008?

I hope to see OpenType finally take over as the majority format for this year’s font sales. It’s like graduating to CDs from cassette tapes — it’s that much better than TrueType and PostScript.

A Very Tolva Christmas

If you read this blog with unusual devotion, you might recall this quote from 2006 in relation to John Tolva’s annual holiday party: “I’ve got to befriend this guy as soon as possible so I get an invite next year.” Well, we’re proud to announce that we did just that. Not only did we hit up a few neighborhood bars with John throughout 2007, we also went with him to Los Alamos, New Mexico to film a documentary. But, of course, the big moment of pride was when we got a much-coveted invite to his annual party. John has the full report here, if you’d like to read up on what it was like and what it takes to put together one of the best holiday parties around. What’s more, and how this all comes full circle to become relevant, is that John once again gave out holiday mix discs, packaged in Jewelboxing, complete with a mini-pencil in the case’s spine, allowing you to check off if you were naughty, nice or a little of both. And once more, they were a blast to pick up and bring home.

But he didn’t stop there. On his terrific site, Ascent Stage, he offered up a few pointers in making Jewelboxing a little easier to work withwhen you’re printing a bazillion of them and you’ve got to get them out in a hurry. Here’s a couple:

 

  • “It is much easier to label the CD’s once you’ve set them in the case on the spindle. This holds them still while you apply.”
  • “When ripping the perforations on the [Standard tray] sheet it is much easier to rip it latitudinally (the long side) first, then longitudinally.”
  • “Those crazy tiny diagonal perforations near the hinge? Cut them with a small pair of scissors. Much easier than ripping them.”
  • “Once you’ve printed the booklet inserts it is best to put stack them into 10 or 15 or so and weigh them down overnight with something heavy. This flattens them out so they sit in the tray better.”

 

There’s a few more beyond that, but we didn’t want John to get angry at us for swiping all the content off his site. It’s a great batch of info, so we highly encourage you to check it out before your next project.

Thanks again to John for the invitations and the great pointers and to those in Eureka, Brooklyn, Marina Del Ray, Atlanta, Henderson, Leamington Spa, West Covina, Des Moines, Evanston, Louisville, Savannah, San Francisco, Ventura, Crows Nest, Raleigh, St. Paul, New Kensington, Hatton, Jacksonville, Minneapolis, Alexandria, New York and Kalispell.

November 12, 2017 | Category: Blog

Case Study 9: Making Sense of Marcel Duchamp

We’re always excited when we get in samples of people’s work who have used Jewelboxing, but from time to time, something shows up that just goes above and beyond. That’s when we put together a Case Study, a special feature where we interview the creator of said “something special.” This time, we were fortunate enough to get a chance to talk with Andrew Staffordabout his fantastic Making Sense of Marcel Duchamp. Without further delay, let’s get right into it:

There doesn’t seem to be a commercial or institutional sponsor for Making Sense of Marcel Duchamp. Was it a commissioned work? Or an interest you had in Duchamp’s work that led to building the project? The “why” is a mystery.

How could I resist? Sometimes you have an idea, sometimes the idea has you. From its conception it seemed like a dream project, with a compelling unity of subject and media, content and form; and for me personally, a convergence of interests in Duchamp, information design, clear thinking, and plain language. Duchamp wanted people to participate in his art, what better way to demonstrate that than via user interactivity? The Large Glass is a diagram of a dynamic process, like a Rube Goldberg contraption, what better way to demonstrate that process than by animating it? I made it because I felt it would be an interesting and above all useful way to explore the ideas underlying Duchamp’s art. Plus, I thought it would be a lot of fun.

Was it? A lot of fun to make?

Sure, except when it was driving me crazy. Fortunately for my sanity, whenever I got tired of struggling with a Flash movie, I could give it a rest and go back to wrestling with the text. One thing’s for sure, it was never boring.

What was the hardest part?

Flash had a pretty steep learning curve. You know what, that wasn’t the hardest part, though. Let’s come back to that question later.

What was your research process in developing Understanding Duchamp?

The research process was an ordinary, time-tested one: look, read, ask, listen, think. You know the drill.

Was there something in particular that stands out that was just invaluable?

Not one thing, lots of things. If it was a flashback sequence it would have to start long ago with my friend Kate handing me a copy of Marcel Duchamp [d’Harnoncourt & McShine, 1973], saying “I think you’ll like this”… pilgrimages to MOMA, Tate Modern, the Philadelphia Museum of Art… Calvin Tomkins’ Duchamp: A Biography, which I cannot praise highly enough… a revelatory vision of The Large Glass in motion at the Weisman Art Museum… learning how to replicate the 3 Standard Stoppages… invaluable endless discussions with friends and colleagues… especially with my friend Nick Meriwether, who bravely volunteered to show me how to finish the text. That’s some of the highlights, anyway.

Did you learn anything new?

Lots. One thing that I got out of it was an appreciation of how some of Duchamp’s art invites physical interaction, and some of it invites personal interpretation, but both are pursuing the same objective: the participation of the observer, enticing lookers out of a passive mode into active engagement.

What was your design process?

I hope this doesn’t sound evasive or inarticulate, but it just evolved, stepwise, more or less organically. I don’t have a professional background in design, or to put it nicely my design education has been self-directed. For me, the design process is empirical and iterative, proceeding by trial-and-error and inevitably including more than a few false starts and cul-de-sacs along the way.

So was designing the website the hardest part?

There was always a way to go forward, at least one way, even if sometimes it meant backtracking later. For the most part, design decisions were guided by simply trying to do what the content demanded.

What about deciding on a structure? From the beginning did you decide that it had to be a timeline? What drew you to that instead of say, writing an essay or a book about Duchamp, or blocking it out in sections (i.e. 1. His Life, 2. His Art, 3. His Legacy)?

I tried out different ideas and didn’t settle on a timeline until the content was more than halfway done. What attracted me to the idea of a timeline was that the navigation device itself IS useful information: first, the numerous multiple miniatures, and second, their chronology. Each of the miniatures is repeated, larger, at the start of each chapter, which keeps people oriented as they click deeper into the content.

Beyond just the nuts and bolts of it, the timeline structure also seems like the best way of capturing Duchamp, since a lot of his work revolves around time, like with The Large Glass, where A leads to B leads to C and so on. Was that also a factor in the decision?

Not consciously, but I’m sure you’re right. Another reason it works is because Duchamp was not inclined to repeat himself, he kept pushing the envelope, so his output grew more diverse over time: paintings, objects, installations, machines. Obviously a row of stamp-sized canvases would be a lot less interesting to look at than spinning bicycle wheels and rotating optical disks.

There’s that famous essay by Walter Benjamin, The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, where he says that a piece of art loses its aura or mystique because it’s being reproduced again and again and becomes so familiar. Duchamp seemed to be commenting on that, in some degree, with his famous L.H.O.O.Q., some twenty years before Benjamin sat down to write about it. Do you have any thoughts about that?

Francis Naumann wrote a book, lovely to look at and not overly academic, that gave special attention to the conjunction of Duchamp’s art and Benjamin’s ideas. Did you know Duchamp and Benjamin met once? In spring of 1938, at a left bank café. Nothing of consequence came of it: Duchamp proudly showed Benjamin a small, hand-colored reproduction of Nude Descending a Staircase. In his diary Benjamin called it “breathtakingly beautiful.”

That demystifying of art that Benjamin talked about, is what you’re doing here similar to that? By reproducing and explaining in detail, not just on discs but for everyone with a web connection?

I hope so.

Your case, recreating Duchamp’s Large Glass on the very cover, is without a doubt one of the most impressive things we’ve ever seen done with Jewelboxing. Can you tell us a little about the process of creating it?

I wanted to make a small number of copies of Making Sense of Marcel Duchamp on CD, as gifts. When I ordered my first Jewelboxing 20-pack, I didn’t have any preconceived ideas for the case’s design. But in retrospect it seems so obvious, doesn’t it: The Large Glass meets Understanding Duchamp meets Jewelboxing equals this, how could it be otherwise? It’s such a sweet match-up of content and package, how could I resist? Trouble was, first, I couldn’t imagine how to make it; and second, when I did imagine how to make it, I didn’t know how to screenprint; and third, after I learned how to screenprint, I had to find a pigment and a substrate that would work together.

So, was making the cases the hardest part?

No, it took practice and plenty of experimentation, but it wasn’t the hardest part.

I wanted to ask about the slipcover you made to hold the case. Were those printed by you and if so, can you tell us a little about that?

The material was a basic cotton 120 lb. folio vellum, trimmed to 8.5″ wide to fit through my Epson 260. Make a template with cutting and creasing guides. Design as necessary. Print, score, cut, wrap, glue. Punch a semicircular notch at top. Spray the finished piece with a fixative.

So, what was the hardest part?

The hardest part turned out to be the task I thought I would be best at: writing the text.

What made it so difficult?

The challenge was to explain the essential ideas behind Duchamp’s art in precise, plain language without glossing over the hard questions it raises. The first difficulty was editorial, deciding what could be left out without diminishing the substance of those ideas. The second difficulty was compositional, finding clear, simple language to explain those ideas within the design-dictated constraint of a mere 100 words per panel. It’s safe to say that I underestimated the challenge of fitting such large ideas into such small containers. The final result was highly compressed prose, which I hope nonetheless reads like everyday language. Overall the text and visuals evolved in tandem, each informing the other, which I hope lends the whole thing an organic unity.

I don’t know if this question enters your head or not, but I assume that it must, once you get far enough down the line: do you think this would be something Marcel Duchamp would have appreciated? That he would have enjoyed reading through and participating in?

I like to think so. All we can be sure of is that he would have responded with detached bemusement. It was his usual response to… well, everything in the world, including his own iconoclastic imagination.

On the Topic of Police Officers and Bicycles

We’re big fans of the Byrd brothers, Aaron and Kevin. If you’re a regular Coudal reader, you’ve probably seen a lot of “via”s back to Byrdhouse, or links to some of their various projects and even right here on the Jewelboxing blog, like highlighting their film The Cycle Theory. So it was with great happiness that they decided to use Jewelboxing again to package their latest project, the delightfully absurd music video, Cops on Bikes. Here’s from the two of them:

On the project itself: “The video footage for Cops on Bikes was shot on a Sony still camera set to the ‘mpeg video’ option. We were hoping for a digital low-rent quality HD-Cams have trouble capturing. The stop animation stills were shot on a Canon 30D using 2 lenses, a 24-105mm and a crappy stereo lens. The slides are from Kevin’s analog collection. Aaron edited the video with Final Cut Pro. Kevin did some too. Aaron is Thriller 2.”

On using Jewelboxing: “We made the video with Jewelboxing in mind and knew the pictures and type treatment from the video and website would translate nicely. We went for an exploratory aspect with the case: all type on the outside, picture goodness on the inside to provide a nice contrast for one who opens it for the first time.”

“We thought it’d be nice to include headshots of the castmembers inside the dvd case usisng the photographic stills we used in the video. It was really exciting to see the media stretch across all platforms especially when transferring to something as slick as Jewelboxing.”

Kevin and Aaron were also kind enough to provide us with additional quotes, should we need them for this post, each of which we would feel sad if the world didn’t get a chance to read, so here they are:

From Aaron:
“Jewelboxing goes great with my beard, so I try to carry it around as an accessory whenever possible.”
“Girls tend to notice when you’re designing with Jewelboxing.”
“Where are the jewels? What a bunch of bull$%#*.”

From Kevin:
“I threw one at traffic once and it didnt break.”
“We sell them out our trunk at football games.”
“Aaron’s beard is real nice. I’m a lil’ jealous. I think Jewelboxing has done well for him.”

If that doesn’t sell you on the quality of the cases, nothing will. Thanks much to the Byrds for writing in and here’s to hoping that similar beard-related successes are being had in Alexandria, Brooklyn, Los Angeles, Sherman Oaks, New York, Boston, Ketchum, Durham, Lorton, Salt Lake City, Aliso Viejo, Edmonton, White Plains, Brampton, Lisle, Birmingham, Butler, Stanford, Basingstoke, Atlanta and Honolulu.

November 12, 2017 | Category: Blog

The Pleasure of the Padded Envelope

Is there anything as satisfying than finally shipping off the final version of a project for a client? You’ve worked long, hard hours, you’ve gone back and forth a million times, sometimes muttering the occasional unmentionable under your breath when you don’t necessarily agree with a decision, but that’s all in the past now. Whatever it is: it’s done, you’re happy and so is your client (hopefully it ends this way at least).

But even if your work exists entirely in ones and zeros, like with web design, it’s nice to have that “shipping it out” feeling of completion too, for all parties involved. Or so says Debbie Campbell of Red Kite Creative, who was kind enough to send us over some of her work, beautifully packaged in Jewelboxing Standards, and her reason why she sounds out finished websites on disc. Here’s from Debbie:

“I’m a web designer, and when I launch a project I always create a production CD for my client. I like to create a nice-looking package that reiterates both my ‘brand’ and my design skills, so the client is left with a tangible piece of my work to keep (and not just a digital website).”

“Jewelboxing is superior in every way to the regular CD cases I’d been using. I like the heavy weight of the plastic, and I really like the templating system. It’s easy to use and the quality and elegance of the finished product shows off my work nicely.”

Here’s to hoping trips to the post office are in the near future for those in Encinitas, Venice, Chicago, Poughkeepsie, Berkeley, Houston, Santa Monica, San Francisco, New York, Oakland, Decatur, Victoria, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Port Washington, Sydney, Winston-Salem, Tampa, Louisville, Granite City, Copenhagen, Williamsburg and Vancouver.

November 12, 2017 | Category: Blog

Unusual Made Presentable

We’ve made a lot of absurd films in our time; loaded up with non sequiturs, heaps of unabashed silliness and a great abundance of nonsense. But Steve Gadlin takes absurdity to bold, daring new heights. If you’re not in Chicago, you should consider yourself unfortunate for not having been privy to any number of the shows he’s produced, from Impress These Apes, where a handful of contestants return with new material each week for eight straight weeks, trying to entertain three Earth-conquering apes, or their long-running Don’t Spit the Watershow, wherein audience members are invited on stage, given a gulp of water to hold in their mouth, then taunted by stand-up comedians who attempt to make them laugh, thus making them spit said water. It truly is a thing to behold. And does it make it any more unusual that Gadlin often appears alongside his comedy partner, Paul Luikart, as the “International Comedy Sensation,” Sasha & The Noob, two men of vague Eastern European origin, one of whom doesn’t speak. It’s our kind of deliciously weird comedy, and being longtime friends with Steve, we were thrilled when he e-mailed us and said, “Hey, I just ordered some Jewelboxing cases!” To which we responded, “So tell us about it!” Here’s his response:

“The Timekeeper Willis Boot Camp DVD features one of the regular cast members from the stage show, Timekeeper Willis (Bryan Bowden), a shirtless, egotistical tough guy who always wears a wrestler’s mask and a giant clock around his neck. I decided that he needed to have a workout video, showing how he gets into shape. We hired real fitness models, developed whole exercise routines and shot it all in a gym. We also included a few of the unusual characters from the show, so it walks that confusing line between, ‘Is this for real?’ and ‘No, this can’t be for real, can it?’ which we kinda live for.”

“It was just one of those ridiculous projects that just wouldn’t leave me alone. I was still in the process of putting the whole thing together when my Jewelboxing kit arrived, so I kicked everything into high gear. I was so happy with how beautiful the packaging turned out, that I rushed to finish the editing. I just couldn’t wait to burn my first copy, slap on the label, and show off a beautiful product.”

“The system itself is just so complete. It’s a wonderful idea to sell it all as a package. The templates were exact, and everything snapped together so perfectly. After the printing was done, my wife and I spent a happy hour at the dinner table putting it all together. The packaging gets more compliments than the DVD…but that’s fine by me.”

Here’s to hoping there are equally as bizarre things getting packaged as beautifully in Plymouth, Atlanta, Aarhus, Toronto, Louisville, West Drayton, Irvine, Dallas, Portland, Philadelphia, El Paso, Grove City, Seattle, New York, Grand Rapids, Manhattan, Mountain View, Austin, Ithaca, Missouri City, North York, Galway, Middlesbrough, Pittsford, Mitchell, London, Minneapolis, Kirkwall, Vancouver and Emsworth.

November 12, 2017 | Category: Blog

Every Nook and Cranny

We have a soft spot for people who use the spines of Jewelboxing cases. Among a whole slew of miscellaneous objects, we’ve seen pieces of wood, ball bearings, confetti and mini glow sticks. If you visit our FAQ page about the system, you’ll even see an illustration we put together warning that, while the spine is good for putting most anything, things like milk or fire ants probably aren’t such a good idea. So it was a case of case-love-at-first-sight when Megan Rucker a designer at the University of Texas at Austin told us about a project she and her colleagues recently put together:

“A coworker on our graphics team was leaving and we wanted to give him something. We all submitted a song or two for his going away CD.”

“I used Jewelboxing after reading about it from someplace cool. I can’t remember where now, but one of the cool kids out on the internets was talking ’bout it. I was impressed after visiting Jewelboxing website — it looked easy enough and I enjoy designing for these types of things. Once I received the box from you, the fun began. It was a very enjoyable project and made even easier with Jewelboxing templates (because I’m pretty lame at lining stuff up to print out right).”

“I put the twigs in the spine after I saw an example on your website of someone putting something in there — oh yeah, it was M&Ms;, I think. Andy is a nature kind of guy and it seemed appropriate. Although later, another coworker said she could think of something he likes even more and that would fit in there nicely too. Ha!”

Let’s hope there’s lots of random things being trimmed, controlled substances or otherwise, to fit just right in Chicago, Reston, Stonington (which we refuse to make an immediate callback joke about), New York, Fresno, Hagerstown, Newbury Park, Bayville, Toronto, Los Angeles, Knoxville, Loomis, Peterborough, Washington DC, Woodstock, Charlotte, San Francisco, Worcester, Santa Monica, Bethesda, Shakopee, St. Valentin and Copenhagen.

November 12, 2017 | Category: Blog

Love is…Receiving an Attractive Mix Disc

Perhaps the middle of August isn’t the most ideal time to be talking about Valentine’s Day, but let’s not get bogged down by semantics. It’s always a good time to talk about clever ideas and well-thought design, both of which are perfect descriptors for Dan LaMee’s “Red Roses Mix” project. We caught up with Dan after finding photos of the project he’d posted on Flickrand asked if he wouldn’t mind telling us about it. He didn’t mind at all and thus, we have the full report:

“As it was approaching Valentine’s Day five or six years ago, I was unsure of what to do for all my single girl friends. I wanted to do something special, memorable, and more lasting than a cut flower, so after thinking about it for awhile I decided to make a music mix of 12 songs and thus the first “Red Roses Mix” was born. The first discs were “packaged” in simple slim cases with no special artwork, but for the last few years I’ve used Jewelboxing cases to help make the mixes even that much more memorable. For this year’s artwork, I had what I consider a brilliant and funny idea to use some Valentine’s Day print boxers as the main subject. I knew they would generate a laugh and would also fit the theme of the holiday. It took me several iterations to get right, as well as some discussion with a friend, but in the end I think I achieved my goals of a semi-professional looking packaging design using mostly photos I’ve taken! And the finished product, well, it had the effect I wanted it to!”

“I went with Jewelboxing cases after seeing what other people were doing with them on your blog and the examples page. Those examples were the inspiration for me to think that despite having no official “graphic design” training and only a few art classes, I could create interesting and cool cases for people! So I did! In fact, I should probably send a copy of the latest one to the Swap Meat, if it’s swap worthy.”

Here’s to hoping that, after Dan’s lead, there’s lots more love and laughter-inducing material being created in New York, Santa Monica, Tucson, Philadelphia, Bangor, Uniontown, La Palma, Essex, Northampton, Dublin, San Jose, Bradford, Santa Clarita, Falls Village, Bournemouth, Santa Barbara, Minneapolis, Alexandria, Brooklyn, Miami, Glendora, Harrisburg, Maple Ridge, Winnipeg, Chicago, Fresno, Allentown and Toronto.

November 12, 2017 | Category: Blog

Sara France, the Apple of Our Eye

While we think that everyone who writes into us about their Jewelboxing projects are a big deal, rare is the case when we talk to someone who has been selected for the highly-coveted spot in an Apple testimonial. So it was with Sara France, owner of the aptly named Sara France Photography, based out of San Diego, California. Sara’s long been a Jewelboxing customer and we’ve been thrilled from start that she thinks so highly of the system to include it in the process of her attention-grabbing work (she even sells her own Jewelboxing templates, should you be interested in using her photos). You’ll learn a lot about Sara in the Apple profile, so make sure you read that. For the short summary and the reason she chose to go with Jewelboxing, here’s straight from the her keyboard to you:

“I’m a Southern California based photographer, capturing weddings, portraiture, and commercial photography all over the world, landing features in many publications including Modern Bride, Ceremony Magazine and San Diego Style Weddings. I think my passion for people, photography and business have created the success I’ve had with Sara France Photography, which runs with just two people, myself and an associate photographer.”

“Jewelboxing was such an obvious choice for me with the unique, clean, and modern look of the cases along with the system being completely customizable, allowing us to make each case unique to the client without costing us a lot of time totally rebuilding the layout — our clients love that. I am very particular about products that leave my studio because every one of them is a marketing piece for my business and the Jewelboxing has the same high quality in their product and service that I demand for my clients. I created my own layout in pages for the DVD cases and they are such a breeze to print and assemble. The people at Apple were just as impressed with the finished product as I was and decided to feature my cases and business on their site.”

Here’s to hoping profiles are being drafted as we type this for all those in Savannah, Yonkers, Chicago, Waterloo, Atlanta, Jersey Shore, Jeffersonville, Toronto, Cincinnati, San Luis Obispo, Pasadena, Southfield, Brooklyn, Mansfield, New York, Valley Center, Lake Oswego, Fresno, Sunnyvale, Petaluma, Columbus and Minneapolis.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

Making Noise

It’s too quiet here today at JB headquarters, especially because your regular correspondent Steve is traipsing across Nebraska with a camera this week (but that’s another story) so we thought we’d make a little noise. No, we aren’t starting a band or making a music video. Although now that I’ve said that, someone will probably want to. Anyway, we want to make a little noise so we are going to give away a free Canon Pixma iP6700D Inkjet printer, our fave and a perfect match for our system.

Starting right now, anyone who places an order for anything from Jewelboxing and drops a line to crew at jewelboxing dot com to tell us they saw this note, will be entered into the pool to win the printer. We’ll close the entries at 5:00 CST on Friday, July 27th and announce the winner at 5:01.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

Sermon on the Disc

Unless you’re a politician, the president of the high school debate club or have some weird addiction to Toastmasters, you’re probably like everyone else in the world who finds it difficult to be “on” with any regularity. Most people are just too swamped with all the miscellaneous details of life to be brilliant even just once a month. For church pastors, it’s the same deal. But unlike most people, they’ve got just as much on their to-do plates but there’s a whole congregation that shows up week after week and are expecting brilliance and touching moments of insight. Jewelboxing user Drew Binkley knew this and realized there was something he could do to help out, as well as launch a new side of his business doing just that. Here’s from Drew:

“We believe our tagline for SermonPaks, ‘Package. Promote. Preach.,’ describes perfectly what our company is all about. Pastors today can get so carried away with trying to promote their next sermon that they sometimes forget the true purpose of what they’re doing, or neglect the time needed to properly prepare for one of the most important aspects of their job. They are there to preach, because that’s where their talents are, not in designing miscellaneous promotional items. That’s where we hope SermonPaks will come in — we create all the promotional materials so they don’t have to, letting them get back to what’s important and successfully pull off their next sermon series. We provide them with everything they need, from bulletin shells to mini-inviter cards, to even CDs with things like photos and movies to use with their projection software, images to place on their web site and a variety of posters and jacket and CD labels, all with the idea of lending a hand to in-house media ministries and overall promotion throughout the church. And we try to keep it all very affordable by charging less than two hundred dollars for a complete kit.”

“It goes without saying that we could not have pulled it off if not for Jewelboxing and the ease of use that comes with it. Your system helps us keep a very low inventory with on-demand fulfillment within a matter of minutes, which is ideal for the type of product SermonPaks are.”

Here’s to hoping some hands are being lent to those in Riverside, Oak Park, State College, Sunbury, Brooklyn, Atlanta, Brea, New York, Louisville, Chattanooga, Oslo, Live Oak, Chandler, Vancouver, Boston, Baltimore, Fall River, Tybee Island, Harrogate, Sparks, Chicago, Sugar Hill, Apple Valley and Pasadena.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

Clean Hard Drives and Charitable Friends

 

Around this time last year, we heard from musician Danny Adler, who had packaged his last album using Jewelboxing. This week we heard from him again as he let us know that he’d been keeping as prolific as ever and has just recently released two brand new albums with a whole slew of music, packaged just as beautifully as before. Here’s from Danny about each:

“The first, is Outmoded – Vintage SGX. I’ve been doing music for about 7 years now and I’ve got a backlog of old, old stuff that’s just been sitting on my hard drive. It is good stuff, but too different from my current style, and production quality isn’t quite there, as I was learning while making it. The way that the Jewelboxing cases can hold 2 discs was magnificent for my this collection of about 3 years’ worth of my music.”

Sample tracks: Realize and The Way Up.

“The second album is SGXRMX2 – SGX Remix Project 2.0. This is the second time I’ve opened up a bunch of my tracks for remixing to friends and fans and put together an album from the result. I didn’t want to deal with selling the album for profit and then attempt to pay those who participated their $10 cut of my AMAZING income on it (sarcasm), so I had planned to release the album solely as a free download. Then it occurred to me that since there was SOME money to be made, I could donate any of the profits to charity. So, along with posting them soon on iTunes, with some leftover Jewelboxing cases I had, I printed up a few and sold them for $25 with all profits going to PMFFC, my friend’s record-label-for-charity. I’m sold out now, but the few I made went fast, so I am planning a small reprint.”

Sample tracks: Coactive – HyBound’s Retroactive Breaks Mixand Me Semper Maneas – Nicole Adams Mix.

Let’s hope there’s as much impressive work getting done as there is at Danny’s studio in Gladwyne, Williamsburg, Santa Barbara, New York, Los Angeles, Baltimore, Salt Lake City, Quebec, Niceville, New Orleans, Savannah, London, Naples, Boston, Seattle, Fort Washington, Columbus, Montreal, Nashville and San Jose.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

Fiasco in Florida

Depending on your situation, twenty-four hours can seem like an eternity. If, say, you’re stranded at Chicago’s O’Hare airport during the weekly blizzards we have here come winter, you’re likely going to feel every minute of each of those twenty-four. On the other hand, if you find yourself having to make a complete movie with set rules and people you’ve never met before, well, you’re going to be looking at your watch at the end, wondering what happened to make time slip by so quickly. That’s the story we heard from Andrew Kamphey, Managing Director of the Film Fiasco 24-hour film fest:

“I got the idea for the Film Fiasco August of 2004 after I had wanted to make a short movie within a day and became upset at the lack of infrastructure that Gainesville, FL and the University of Florida had for short video production. There was no community to speak of in an otherwise creative city. I didn’t want to start something because I knew that someone else could do it better. I started the Film Fiasco out of a need. By just challenging myself to make a movie in 24 hours, I had inadvertently challenged the city of Gainesville. I started talking to people about my idea and finally told it to my friend Priscilla who said ‘Let’s do it!’ Two months later was the first Film Fiasco and the movies you watch on the DVD were all created in 24 hours.”

“There are similar events all around the country in no association with each other and a 48 hour video competition that has events in many cities. We have made ours stand out by including the element of signing up actors independently of the movie-making teams. Two actors are assigned to each team that must include them in the movie, besides the required elements that all of the teams get. This ends up being the toughest part of putting on the event but it makes it special as it speaks to another group of people.”

“There were so many similarities of how the Film Fiasco got started and the beginning of Jewelboxing. From what I know, you guys looked for something that would match your standards of quality, while I looked around for something to quench my creative thirst. Neither of us found anything available out there, so we just made our own, Film Fiasco and Jewelboxing. I think both of the products speak of our passion for something so great that we took on the challenge ourselves. That always gets me, so I had to go with it. I picked up the whole Studio.”

Here’s to all the people making interesting things, in whatever time frame they so desire, in Santa Barbara, Blackstone, Salt Lake City, San Diego, Etobicoke, Toronto, Wicomico, Phila, Santa Rosa, Cedar Park, Los Angeles, Savannah, Irvine, Dulles, Round Lake, Kansas City, Winston-Salem, Brookline and Brompton.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

Sikhs Hit the Streets

Earlier this week, we received a note from Jewelboxing user Sartaj Singh Dhami, letting us know about his latest project, a documentary he had produced about the Sikh religion. We’re all big film buffs here and we’ve made a few shorts in our time as well, so we’re always really happy when someone like Sartaj thinks enough of our cases to package his hard work. And it’s all the more flattering when it’s a film with an important message. Here’s Sartaj’s report:

Sikh on the Street, created by my production company, Dashmesh Pictures, is a short film that challenges the perceptions of everyday Americans to what they think of those who don a turban and beard. Are they Muslims? Are they Arabs? Or are they members to another unique community?”

“The film asks people on the street who the Sikhs are. Unknown to most, 99% of all individuals encountered in the western world that have turbans and beards are adherents to the Sikh religion, a monotheistic faith based in the Punjab region of India. Since the unfortunate attacks of 9/11, many Sikhs have encountered unwanted backlash due to their unique identities by being mistaken as followers, or adherents, to Islamic radical terrorists. Filmed in 2005, Sikh on the Streetchallenges the everyday Joe to see if they know who the Sikhs are after large amounts of outreach had been done by the Sikh community.”

“With the recent success of film, such as being shown in several film festivals and incorporated into curriculums at Iowa State and Harvard University, a new level of professionalism was needed to be added that was also economical. Jewelboxing allowed for this by providing the tools needed in order to create DVD box art and casing with simplicity. By using the templates and a standard inkjet printer, our cases were created with ease, allowing for a professional look, within a reasonable budget, that promotes recipients to actually open and learn more about the project. Thanks Jewelboxing!”

Here’s to hoping that all sorts of people are being correctly identified and having their work appreciated in Gilbert, New York, St. Paul, Milaca, San Jose, Grand Rapids, Parma, Minneapolis, Fair Lawn, South Miami, Great Neck, Riverside, Kansas City, Baton Rouge, North Vancouver, Lakewood, Los Angeles, Sterling Heights, Cleveland and Salt Lake City.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

Winner Takes All

Tammy from Weddings of the Rockies is our Jewelboxing “Upgrade Me!” winner from last week’s Infrequent Mailing.Tammy was paying attention and noticed the contest. She dropped us a line after she made a purchase and her 100pack was randomly picked to become a completely complete Jewelboxing Studio, valued at $764. Congrats on that.

We’re always adding special deals and contests just like this, so if you don’t want to miss the next one, there’s only one thing to do: subscribe. Just add your e-mail address over at the bottom of the Jewelboxing home page and you’re all set.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

Drawing the Lines

Dawson, here at the studio, always has his eye out for groups putting together something particularly interesting. The other day, he passed an e-mail reading, “Hey, check these guys out.” Check them out we did. They’re the Vilppu Store, selling educational DVDs made by famous artist and go-to animation expert, Glenn Vilppu. They’ve just recently started using Jewelboxing King cases to package their collections of multiple training discs and we got the whole story from Samantha Vilppu who runs the shop (along with being Glenn’s daugher-in-law):

“Glenn is world renowned for teaching artists, especially animators and CG artists, how to draw. His main areas of emphasis are in life drawing, the human figure and animals. In the 1970’s, he went to work at Disney as an artist. While there he quickly moved into a position of teaching the animators there how to draw. This evolved into him setting the standard for the animation industry to this day. He’s a teacher’s teacher, meaning that many people now teaching drawing or animation originally learned from him. His books are used as textbooks in many art schools across the country, and are on the list of “must haves” by the animation studios. Many of the art school libraries have his entire collection of DVDs. In fact, many artists are collectors of every educational product he has ever produced! Which brings us to why we started using Jewelboxing.”

“The regular cases that his individual DVDs had been packaged in were not ideal for the library shelves, either in the schools or in the private libraries of artists, where they like to show off their collection of all the DVDs in our bulk sets . Since we took over the store, we have been steadily improving the Vilppu image and branding and decided that we would upgrade to Jewelboxing King cases for those clients who purchased the full collections. We considered other alternatives, but decided that Jewelboxing would give us an edge of quality that the other options didn’t. Since using Jewelboxing, we have seen the sales of our sets (in which the cases are included at no extra charge) increase dramatically – in fact we have seen the two best months out of 2 years already this year, because of the increased sales of these special collections.”

Here’s to hoping everything is looking perfectly illustrated with all the characters in Austin, Montgomery, Temecula, Housatonic, Chicago, Atlanta, Scottsdale, Santa Barbara, Highland Falls, Los Angeles, Hollywood, Toronto, Spingville, Gainesville, Venice, Santa Monica, Morrisville, New York, Davis, La Palma, Brampton, Mililani, Vancouver, New Brunswick, Nisswa, Rochester and Fairfield.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

A Touch Lighter, A Lot Better

We’re nothing if not constant tinkerers around here. If you’ve been following this blog, you’ve probably noticed that, twice during the last three years, we’ve announced that we were rolling out new and improved paper stock. Today we’re doing it again.

We’ve listened to our customers’ requests for what they’d like to see improved and also have taken into consideration new printer technology. The old adage goes that you can’t please all of the people all of the time, but if we can get that percentage running at around 99%, we figure we’re doing pretty well.

Here’s the rundown on what’s new and improved:

* Our custom-milled paper is still a bright, solid stock that really holds ink well, as it always has, but we’ve made it a touch lighter (the old paper was 12 mil, while the new batch is 9.5 mil thick). This means it will feed more smoothly and through a wider variety of printers.

* We’ve vastly improved quality control. New dies and tighter tolerances have improved the paper’s performance relative to the software templates, keeping it much more consistent, batch-to-batch. Also, the perforations are stronger and less prone to accidental separation, while remaining just as easy to punch out.

* The coating on the paper has been modified, making it less “dusty.” This is a barely-noticeable change, but it’s healthier for your printer, as less dust means less wear and tear on rollers and print heads.

These changes should be particularly helpful for users of color laser printers and finicky ink-jets. The new paper will feed and print better and minimize harmful dust residue (we still recommend using the manual feed tray — keeping the paper path as simple as possible always helps).

We’re hoping you’ll find this new stock perfect for your next project. All King (DVD-sized) template paper shipped after May 1, 2007 will incorporate these features and our next batch of Standard (CD-sized) template paper will meet these specs, too. And, as always, we’re eager to hear your thoughts about it, so feel free to drop us a line and let us know what you think.

A Quick Offer: if you’d like to give the new paper a try, just order a 20pack of Kings before the end of the day on Friday, May 11th and then drop a note to “papergeek at jewelboxing dot com” saying you did, and we’ll send you a $10 instant rebate. Cha-ching.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

The Cutting Edge

It’s always fun to hear from Jeff Rutzky. He’s participated in most of the fun quickie contests we occasionally run over at Coudal, drops us e-mails to let us know when he’s found something cool to check out, and was one of the first people to mail us something for our Swap Meat experiment (check out his amazing Kirigami sculpture of Mies van der Rohe’s Crown Hall he made from a Masahiro Chatani design). It makes it all the better that the man’s got loads of talent. He’s the author of several books about Origami and has worked in designing publications, products and a whole host of other projects for an impressive roster of clients, including everyone from Playboy to the Weekly World News. This past month, he finally got around to trying Jewelboxing for the first time, and here’s his report about the project he used the cases for:

“Pro bono, I took a great interest in helping Vanessa Gould and Green Fuse Films to create an identity with a clean, modern look and feel. Her film, Exploring Origami uncovers some of the mystery behind why origami is so intriguing to children, as well as being so critical to modern and future science. I’m also trying to encourage the former-Wall Street exec -turned-film-director to be consistent with fonts and screen graphics. I know she has a limited budget, but free After Effects house calls are just an F-train away.”

Here’s to hoping all is being folded just-so and all the cuts are being made with precision in Washington DC, Cambridge, New York, Jackson, Los Angeles, Colorado Springs, Covington, Utica, Torquay, Monrovia, Columbus, Stevenson Ranch, Bedford, Brooklyn, Lafayette, Valley Stream, Burbank, Santa Barbara, Middletown, Houston, Conroe, Newton, and Jersey City.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

‘Nico’ Case

You’d be hard pressed to find anyone at Jewelboxing who doesn’t own at least one Velvet Underground box set. That’s why we loved receiving a note from Jan-Frederic Goltz in Braunschweig, Germany, about a recent project he put together, expertly using Jewelboxing Kings, for a local theater company putting on a production we really, really hope makes it over here to the States sometime soon. Here’s the whole story from Jan-Frederic:

“‘Nico – Shinx aus Eis’ is a theater performance about Christa Päffgen (the lead singer in The Velvet Underground and Nico) based on her life story and on a book by Werner Fritsch (‘Suhrkampverlag, Frankfurt am Main’) which was put on by the Mehrsicht Projekt Theater in Braunschweig, Germany. They asked me to film and edit the play and I choose to make a complete project out of it.

“The result is this DVD with the video of the theater performance of “Nico” with a total length of one hour and 15 minutes. It additionally contains a multi-angle video layer for each of the three chapters which have a length from 5 to 10 minutes and can be viewed by pressing the angle button on the dvd player’s remote control. These 3 multi-angle parts tell the story in a very different and experimental way. For example, with elements of found-footage from the 60s and 70s, or with self-filmed video content, this little feature gives the spectator the oppportunity to see the performance as a chronological part of the story, which haunts the same plot, but from a different point of view.

“On the DVD, one can also find an installation video (a found-footage clip) which was played in the foyer before the show and a 5 minute long trailer for promotional purposes.”

Here’s to hoping the projects, involving girls in Chelsea or otherwise, are going as splendidly in Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Goleta, Chicago, Storm Lake, Kearney, Portland, New York, St. Louis, Brooklyn, Bonita Springs, Boston, San Diego, Houston, Bloomington, Denver, Tulsa, Hampton, Vancouver, Lackawanna, Saint Francis and Austin.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

Covering the Classics (Sometimes With Talent Even!)

It’s always a great day here at Jewelboxing HQ when someone sends us a copy of an album. There’s enough music geeks here in the office, so the reason why is obvious. Who doesn’t like getting new music out of the blue? It’s all the better when there’s a hook to the whole thing, like when we got in Henry Cline’s latest disc for his Hippopotty Records Music Club, “The Best and Worst Covers.” It’s filled with just that: an eclectic mix of good cover versions of songs (The Brazilian Girls doing the Talking Heads’ Crosseyed and Painless) , horrible ones (the infamous Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds by William Shatner), and miscellaneous, unusual finds (like a lo-fi, live recording of Bjork doing Petula Clark’s Downtown with the Brodsky Quartet). And to make things all the better, the whole deal is beautifully packaged in one of our Standard cases, with a 15 page booklet filled with liner notes and images of truly horrible album covers. Here’s from Henry about the whole project:

“I’m a 46 year old camera operator living in Los Angeles who spends all his free time working on projects like Hippopotty Records Music Club (HRMC), or photography, my website, my blogs, my friends blogs, my next HRMC (even though it is a year away), oh and much much more. Too bad I do not have much free time.

“So, a few years ago I came across an article in Wired magazine about music sharing groups that were sprouting up all over in business settings. Co-workers making compilations for other co-workers and experiencing great bliss in this form of music sharing. I thought, “That is a cool idea, I want that as well”. And thus, Hippopotty Records Music Club was born.

“A cast of thirteen folks from around North America each have a calendar month where they need to make and distribute a compilation of there choice. That is pretty much it.

“At issue number 38, or so, and many gigs of solid music, HRMC rocks on! After a couple of years of circulation it has proved to be very successful and now there seems to be a waiting list to get involved. In a perfect world I would like to see satellite Potty groups gush forth and start a mini-ring of over-lapping music-loving fools all getting great ideas on new music to listen to from veritable strangers.”

Let’s hope there are bands out there working on clever covers about songs already written concerning the lives of those in Brooklyn, Baton Rouge, Bothell, Malibu, Santa Monica, Boulogne Billancourt, Los Altos, Straffan, New York, Derby, Phoenix, Carlsbad, Los Angeles, Venice, Evanston, Novi, Bellingham, Avon, Chicago, Charlotte, Stevenson Ranch, Wickliffe, Boston, Philadelphia, Minneapolis, Nashua, San Francisco, Vancouver, and Detroit.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

Harnessing the Atom

We like to think we’re fairly proficient with motion graphics work around here. We’ve jostled our fair share of keyframes in doing work that our clients seem to really like, but when we get samples in from people like Andrea Toniolo, we feel like downright rank amateurs. Though it would be hard not to when making comparisons to him. His animation work is incredible and on a level that makes you want to keep learning the tools of the trade for as long as it takes, just to try and figure out how he does it. So it goes without saying that we’re honored that he chose Jewelboxing to package his new reel. Here’s from Andrea:

“I’m an Italian director specializing in long green screen shots and match-moving works. Some weeks ago I finished my showreel for 2007 and I was planning to meet with some agencies to work with. The problem for me was making high-quality, “eye-candy” packaging without the cost of industrial printing. I start searching some solutions on the web (with little hope) and finally found your web site. I was impressed by the examples page.”

“Making my own jewelbox with your templates was very fun! Really creative process, because it’s not important to convert RGB to CYMK or other annoying stuff for industrial printing. Only design, test and print! And also, I’m not forced to always make the same cover. I can modify from time to time to fill my specific needs.”

“One thing impresses me overall: the paper with king tray insert always fit in a perfect way when the cover comes closed, without tears or wrong folds. You make my life easier, concentrating only in creative process.”

Here’s to hoping life has become equally as easy in Mountain View, Duluth, Saint-Avold, Boise, New York City, Chicago, Farmingville, Baltimore, Atlanta, West Des Moines, Dallas, Williamsville, Louisville, Opa Locka, Los Angeles, Southfield, Washington DC, Portland, Culver City, Market Rasen, Wood Dale, Lawrence, and Worcester.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

Great Focus

Is there anything more enjoyable than photographing buildings and other feats of architecture? You can keep your scenic landscapes and moody portraits; for us, we love trying to capture the perfectly straight lines, the way the light bounces off a column, or the sheer size of a gigantic room. We couldn’t begin to comprehend the hours we’ve spent down at the Illinois Institute of Technology here in Chicago, shooting Mies’ masterpieces, or the collective hard drive space dedicated to snaps we’ve taken of the beautiful Chicago skyline just outside our studio window. So understandably, we were excited to hear from Jeff Kroeze, a photographer in California who makes his living getting beautiful shots of some the interiors and exteriors of gorgeous buildings. After taking some time to view the amazing work he has posted on his site, here’s the info we got from Jeff about using the system:

“I’m a photographer in Newport Beach, CA, specializing in architectural and travel images. In the competitive Orange County market, Jewelboxing has proven itself as an elegant solution for packaging impressive DVD portfolios destined for new clients. The system allows for great flexibility in design and production. Whether running off 1 or 100, there’s no minimum order to worry about so each one can be customized. I sent out my first batch last week to a great response. They look so classy I want to keep them all for myself! I had a lot of fun with this project and I thank Jewelboxing and Coudal for making it so easy. You’ll be getting another order from me soon.”

Here’s to hoping the f-stops and ISO settings are working out perfectly to capture the lovely things in Garland, Kalamazoo, Tracy, Round Hill, Jefferson, Houston, Roswell, Toronto, Fort Washington, Loveland, Duluth, Ruston, Brooklyn, Burbank, Omaha, New York, Canton, Tujunga, Monroe, New Milford, Flushing, Yarraville, Miami, and North Vancouver.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

Ice Cold

We hear from Jewelboxing users all the time who are packaging their albums, mix discs and demo reels, and we love it because those are the kinds of things we designed the system for. But we also really dig getting letters in from people like Pete Freitag of Foundeo, a company dedicated to creating software for web development, because it proves that there’s this whole other world of different outlets for using the cases beyond music, photos, and films. Here’s from Pete:

“Foundeo’s fusionKit is a CD packed full of software for ColdFusion web developers (ColdFusion is a programming language for building web applications made by Adobe). It features several components handy for building Web 2.0 applications with ColdFusion.”

“We choose Jewelboxing because we wanted to create an attractive product, easily. We were intrigued by the Photoshop templates, and they really made it easy to get the job done. It took just a few hours to get the first prototype printed. The jewel cases alone help make the product attractive, and unique. Overall I think going with Jewelboxing was a big win for our brand.”

We hope the wins are coming in equally as big for the brands, businesses, individuals, or otherwise, in Washington DC, Grand Rapids, La Jolla, Aurora, Corte Madera, Cambria Heights, San Francisco, San Diego, Columbia, Ballwin, Salinas, Plano, New York, Newton, and Austin.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog

Meeting the New Neighbours

Granted, talking about Christmas in February is a bit odd. It’s even a little too early for one of those “Christmas in June!” sales at a local department store. But when you hear from The Neighbourhood, an amazing new firm in Manchester, about the beautiful holiday film they made in December, the time of year takes a back seat. Here’s from Jon Humphreys, Creative Director:

“The Neighbourhood is a CGI imaging/animation company now in our 6th month of business. One of our mission statements is to keep creating self-generated pieces of work. So we thought we would celebrate Christmas and officially announce our arrival into the world with a short animation. After its online release, we received such great response from around the world it made good sense to send out DVD copies to friends, clients etc.”

“After a little searching we discovered the fantastic Jewelboxing solution for the disc packaging. This proved to be a stylish and cost effective way of personalizing our film and present as gifts as we could design and print our own cover with ease. We did decide to make things a little difficult for ourselves though by making 180 in a 2 day time frame to make the last post before Christmas! [here’s a time lapse video of the process] Things would have been a lot tougher if we had to hand cut every cover/insert individually though!”

We’re really happy to have helped The Neighbourhood make their flashy holiday entrance a bit more special. And we hope, even in February, they’re still feeling a little of that spirit in Copenhagen, Toledo, Houston, Los Angeles, Vancouver, Birkdale, Cincinnati, San Jose, Santa Ana, New York, Breckenridge, Minneapolis, Spokane, Grand Rapids, Charlottenlund, East Brunswick, Markham, Manitou Springs, Paoli, Dallas, and Clapham.

November 9, 2017 | Category: Blog