An Esteemed Body of Design-Conscious Individuals

Besides when people write in to share with us what they’ve put together using Jewelboxing, we’ve had a lot of luck over the years finding interesting projects users have posted on Flickr. We’ve been really fortunate in seeing that people think so highly of the cases that they’ve included them in their photo collections that we figured it was about time that we starting collecting up all of this good grace in one central locale. Thus, we’ve made a new Flickr group for all things Jewelboxing-related, appropriated entitled, “Jewelboxing.” Have a photo, or a dozen, of one of your cases that you’re particularly proud of? Go ahead and post it up and join the group. And now that we have this esteemed body of design-conscious individuals, we can’t promise we’ll have annual cook-outs or lapel buttons and secret handshakes to show your allegiance, we can say that we’ll appreciate it plenty.

Thanks to all of those who have joined already and here’s to hoping there are some flash bulbs a-popping and some photos getting posted right now in Edinburgh, Brooklyn Center, Turlock, Santa Cruz, Zurich, New York, London, Poole, San Ramon, Madison, Chandler, Houston, Addison, Alexandria, Amsterdam, Johnson City, Irvine, Marrickville, West Kirby, and San Jose.

Fight Nights

A quick post to show off some new Jewelboxing work by Stephen Coles. You likely know him from his work as the editor of Typographica and The Mid-Century Modernist, and you might remember when we we had the good fortune to sit down and talk with him about his work as Type Director at FontShop in Case Study #10. This time around, he put together a personal project in order to help him cope with Sweden. We know that sentence doesn’t make a whole ton of sense as we put it, so we’ll let Stephen fill in the context:

“My last few months in Stockholm were filled with bitterness and angst, fueled by self-imposed isolation and 4 hours of sunlight per day. The only cure was a cathartic mix CD full of aggressive music.”

“The art is a page ripped from a book I found at a Stockholm bar called The Library. Just discovered tonight that the dude is a Swedish boxer named Ingemar Johansson who won the World Heavyweight Championship in 1955. Fitting that the guy shares my middle name. He looks like I felt at the time.”

Thanks much to Stephen for once again impressing us with his work and here’s to hoping there’s plenty of sunlight in Weehawken, Shanghai, Peoria, Pittsburgh, Barrie, Philadelphia, Indianapolis, Swindon, Grand Rapids, New York, Lower Langford, Sonoma, London, and Omaha.

Making a Good Last Impression

On our blog, it seems like many of our posts about promotional work tend to focus more on that first meeting, that attempt at landing a job. But we ran into an interesting discussion today about the other side of that equation over at the Freelance Switch Forums. The topic was “Packaging of Deliverables” and the initial post was about using Jewelboxing to turn in that final copy to your client of whatever it is you’ve just finished up for them:

Seems like an interesting way to leave a definite, tangible impression with clients. Has anyone else tried this? How did it turn out?

Personally speaking, it’s what we’ve always done here at Jewelboxing and over at Coudal, trying to make a good last impression, and we’ve found that it’s been a success thus far. Though there are, of course, some detractors:

Impressing your clients AFTER the project is complete seems to be a tad backward.

Granted, among those couple of “why would you want to do that?” responses there were some good points, largely stemming from the idea that not all businesses operate in the same way and sometimes a client just needs a file passed along by e-mail or FTP and that’s it. Impressing them at the beginning and sticking to their guidelines at the end might be just enough.

But the vast majority of the replies seemed to see this as a very good idea, continuing that commitment to the project even after the last invoice has gone out. If it’s right for your business and your marketing budget will allow for it, why not make an effort to keep those clients you’ve enjoyed working with coming back and possibly sticking solely with you for the long haul? That seems to be the verdict in the end, that while doing this might not make an instant financial difference to your business, putting the notion that “you’re a class act” in your client’s mind is never a bad idea and has the potential to lead to a lot of positives.

Just something we found interesting on a Friday afternoon and it’s always nice to see our cases discussed from another angle. Here’s to hoping for a great weekend and many happy returns in Fairfax, Austin, Bethesda, Villa Park, Shaker Heights, Media, Greenville, Brookline, Philadelphia, Oberlin, Mississauga, Sycamore, Chicago, South Grafton, Savannah, London, Winter Park, New York City, Vancouver, La Mirada, and Knoxville.

Winning Over Brands By Branding Better

People use Jewelboxing in order to stand out from the crowd for a lot of reasons, like trying to land that job or wanting to impress that certain someone with a mix disc of your favorite songs. Sometimes it’s professional, sometimes it’s just wanting to feel good about whatever it is you put together. When you’re a brand-focused design firm at a trade show or prepping for a massive mailing, it’s absolutely essential. Among a veritable sea of competition, it’s important to be able to wow potential clients with your work before they’ve even stepped foot in your booth or popped that disc into their computer. Jewelboxing-user and firm principal Shawn Borsky understands this completely and dropped us a line to let us know about his latest project:

“My firm, Anthem Design Group, is a brand and website design firm specializing in brand fidelity (new solutions that flow with your current brand), as well as new development, micro sites, product highlights, etc. We used about 1,000 Jewelboxing cases for a direct mail and trade show media kit campaign. The media kits were a showcase and FAQ for our firm’s Q1 and Q2 of 2008, for prospective clients. We actually mailed them with red/violet ribbons that matched the cover ribbon, which also worked with our tag, ‘Brand solutions that flow.'”

“We used Jewelboxing because it allows us much more customization, a better, neater looking package, and durable for direct mail. We had done a print run of 100 before and it worked great. This last time around, we actually had ours custom printed and die cut for the mold, so it looks really fantastic and was very painless. Plus we got screen printed discs. At trade shows, 8 out of 10 people ask if they are free, which is always nice. I recommend Jewelboxing to every other business owner and we use them for all of our client media kits.”

Thanks much to Shawn for writing in and sharing his work with us, and here’s to hoping that 8 out of 10 people are hiring or admiring those in Twickenham, Marietta, Beckenham, Tallahassee, Canterbury, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Columbus, Reading Berkshire, Baltimore, Chatham, Sylvania, Washington DC, Chicago, Pittsburgh, San Diego, Downey, Cambridge, and Gloucester.

A Quick Jewelboxing Run in Less Than Twelve-Parsecs

A post to fall into that “what are we Jewelboxing?” category, here’s a cover Jim made for his son Spencer’s recent birthday party. They took a troop of his friends out to play laser tag and each of the little Jedis received a disc full of music, packaged in Jewelboxing Kings, of course:

 

A happy birthday to Spencer and here’s to hoping that the Laser Battles conclude soon so that peace and order is restored throughout the Republic, particularly in Armadale, San Ramon, Rosemont, Allston, Riverview, Lubbock, Asheville, Athens, Springfield, London, Haslemere, Maribor, Dallas, Ilford, Chicago, Salem, West Henrietta, Highland, Draper, Los Angeles, Orlando, Petaling Jaya, Salt Lake City, and Tatooine.

Well-Polished Promotion

Sometimes, when that extra special project comes around, you have decisions to make along the way. You can either do it proficiently and professionally, or you can chose to push it a little further and create something remarkable that will completely floor your clients (and most importantly, make you proud to show it off, too). Such is the case with Harpreet Padam and his design firm Unlike, who decided to go all out in creating a recent job for a client by including our Standard cases within their fantastic presentation kit. Here’s the whole story from Harpreet:

“We’re a small design firm of two in Bangalore, India called Unlike and we work mostly with fashion and lifestyle brands in the domain of packaging, graphics, and accessory design. The picture I sent you was part of a project for Carbon Accessories, a fashion jewellery brand that sells across India through a shop-in-shop sales module and was looking at expanding into exclusive stores. To enable this through a planned and consistent design identity, Carbon reached out to carefully selected designers/architects across the world, inviting them to associate with the brand.”

“At Unlike, we designed a brand presentation (in Flash), a brochure that provided detailed information about the brand, and a design brief to entice and invite these designers and architects. This was arranged inside an acrylic box that was then personalised to each addressee through coloured DYMO embossing tape. A Jewelboxing-packaged CD contained the Flash presentation and a digitally-printed CD label themed on ‘elevating style,’ the brand mantra and also the theme of this project.”

“Before we decided on Jewelboxing (which I was familiar with for such a long time that I don’t even remember how or when, maybe some design magazine?), we were considering buying single-cased Sony DVDs, discarding the DVDs, and using their jewel case. It’s much cheaper that way since a Jewelboxing case costs about 75 Indian rupees (with postage), and the Sony DVD case works out to 35 Indian rupees with a blank DVD to spare. However, we decided on the more professional and in a way ‘elevating style’ with the Jewelboxing case because of its highly reflective nature (maybe due to its internal form, structure, and gloss). This reflection was also relevant, as most of our client’s products are diamond-studded and shine like crazy. So we let the CD inside show through, encased in all that clarity.”

“About the Jewelboxing experience, well it was quick, fast, and convenient. We originally had some doubts, but Dawson cleared them up in a jiffy. I visited your site again recently because we’re planning to use Jewelboxing for another brand presentation for a new client, a silk furnishings retailer, though this time we plan to silkscreen the case, quite like a Marc Newson DVD we have. I’ll order as soon as I get my proposal approved!”

Thanks to Harpreet and the Unlike Design Company for sharing their work with us and here’s to hoping client socks are being knocked off in Machelen, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Grayslake, Washington DC, Anacortes, Tuscaloosa, Seattle, Layham, Whistler, Norwich, Trujillo Alto, Long Beach, Indianapolis, Zurich, Oakland, and Glen Carbon.

Case Study 11: Alex Gould

You can’t legitimately claim to have a working knowledge of the designer toy world without knowing who James Jarvis is. Certainly one of the pioneers within the recent boom in “the soft vinyl revolution,” his work has helped to inspire hundreds of other designers looking to break into this unique form of design. Director and illustrator Alex Gould was one person who received such inspiration from Jarvis, but also decided to return the favor by creating a documentary about the toy designing icon, appropriately entitled An Interview with James Jarvis. An extremely talented illustrator, designer, and filmmaker in his own right, we got a chance to talk to Alex about himself, his documentary, and what it was like to document Jarvis:

Can you tell us about yourself? Your background?

Born in North Wales. I’m a filmmaker and photographer. I studied Multimedia Arts in University. Currently living in Liverpool.

How would you describe your work?

My work is, as I see it, a way of moving forward with directing films, every project I’ve worked on is connected in small details, the thinking, how it is put together and the end vision. All add to enhancing my skills as a director, be it through the medium of film, photography, illustration, or design.

What’s the origin of the name Ika Zcha?

Ah, it has something to do with watching a lot of Takashi Kitano films as a teenager…

Can you tell us about An Interview with James Jarvis?

The film looks at his drawing and the thought processes that go into his work. This spans across the two comics that he published through Silas and then Amos as well as his commercial & personal illustration work. It also has a short interview with Aiden Onn the owner of Playlounge a vinyl toy shop in London, that gives a perspective on the toys he produces under Amos and who buys them. It’s mainly aimed at fans of his work and illustrators.

How did the project come about? Did you know Jarvis? A longtime fan and decided to make a film about him?

I was already a huge fan of his work, however this film started out with a personal obsession I have about Hergé the creator of Tintin. I had been planning what to do for my dissertation and wanted to get in touch with James Jarvis to ask a few questions about the influence of Hergé on his work. Initially I asked one of my tutors who knew Jarvis to break the ice, about me contacting him. I then e-mailed James a rough outline of the questions I wanted to ask him and he responded positively to the line of questioning and me coming to London to film him.

What was the production like? You’ve said on the site that you spent two days with Jarvis at his office? Were you always by his side, asking questions, or did you get the questions you were after and then try to disappear as much as possible and try to capture things as they played out normally?

The production was filmed during a slightly quieter than usual period for James, so the office was not too hectic. I was trying to avoid being obtrusive, but I was very curious and fascinated so there were a lot of questions I asked even when the camera was off. The first day lasted longer than planned originally it was only an hour or two but it stretched into the majority of the day. On the second day of filming the office was busier so our time was slightly less than the day before. My approach was filming all the questions that I had in a straight interview, then work in a much more flexible approach around the office and ask ad-hoc questions and film it as it happened, it was good combining these two methods as when it came to edit the film there was a nice variety of shots and situations to edit with.

Specific details about the production? What you shot it on, how much footage you had at the end of those two days, how long it took to edit?

It was shot on HDV. After the two days filming I had just under four hours of raw footage. With so much footage to choose from editing took a lot longer than usual, it was around a month to pull together the final cut, then another couple of days colouring it in Magic Bullet suite.

Did you have a background in filmmaking or did you decide that you absolutely had to make a film about James Jarvis, picked up a camera, and went with it?

I already had a background in filmmaking. With any film I make the story or person has to be something I’m fascinated in. Being a big fan of his work and not really finding the answers to questions that I had in other interviews, it seemed natural to go out there and make a film about him and ask those questions.

Has the film played at festivals, or design/illustration events, etc? What was your plan with the film after it was completed?

I had initially wanted to push it for television channels, I put up an online version of it that James Jarvis put on his blog and subsequently streetwear blogs like Hypebeast put it up, more recently Kanye West put a post about James Jarvis on his blog along with my film, which was a bit weird. I’d like to see the film play in a few documentary festivals and definitely some illustration events.

What was Jarvis’ reaction to the film?

James thought that the film worked well, he especially enjoyed the speeded up section with him drawing out an A4 illustration especially to camera.

I think that the time spent filming the interview was the most important part for James as it was a rare chance to look retrospectively at all his previous work. As a professional illustrator he is constantly moving forward and doing new work it was a chance to stop and look back over the work and think about it in more detail.

You’re a very talented illustrator yourself. Do you see Jarvis as a big influence?

Ha ha. I’d say I was mediocre at best. Yes definitely, especially after meeting and talking to him about the level of thinking that goes into each illustration, listening to his advice and the fact that someone as talented as James Jarvis would say yes to me coming to where he works asking loads of questions and filming him was an incredible experience.

Any other illustrators you greatly admire? If so, any plans to make films about them and start a series?

I’m a big fan of Chris Ware, Charles Burns, Daniel Clowes, and Gary Panter. I love TADO’s work it’s been on my mind to do a series of shorts on talented illustrators, but I’m currently working on other projects at the moment.

You packaged the film using one of our Jewelboxing King cases and they’re just fantastic. Any details on the process of putting it all together?

I had already bookmarked the Jewelboxing site a few months before I had started filming looking for some high quality packaging that had the right finish and looked professional. Initially I was more concerned with the typeface for the cover, whilst filming in Amos offices I’d taken a lot of photographs in the breaks between filming, these were used full bleed throughout the packaging, the type was slightly transparent allowing the lines of the drawings to show through.

What’s next for you?

Currently I’m writing a feature film. In pre-production for a short film about a local organist who plays whilst a cinema screen rises out of the floor and another short film about the darker side of dog walking. Also start shooting a music video in a few weeks time for an interesting band.

Favor the Moments

A while back, we ran across this post over at the popular Weddingbee site, where blogger Miss Pomegranate (each of their writers take on secret identities) talked briefly about her plans to use Jewelboxing as the favors for her upcoming wedding. As we went back and read her previous posts, each about various preparations, we knew that whatever she came up with would be terrific, given her eye for design and a knack for the do-it-yourself. And correct we were, as she’s just followed up by posting her finished CDs, beautifully packaged in our Standard cases. What’s more, like with all of her posts, she went above and beyond by writing out all the details of creating all 150 favors, from start to finish. If you’re at all curious about the process of putting together a 100+ Jewelboxing project with just yourself or with you and another person, we highly recommend starting with her write-up. Also, make sure to check out how she connected these favors to the designs for all of her other wedding accouterments

Thanks to Miss Pomegranate (or “Kate”) for sharing her Jewelboxing experience, and we wish her all the best when the big day rolls around in just a few short weeks. And here’s to hoping there are big days of all kinds on their way to Alexandria, Washington DC, Chicago, New York, Vernon Hills, Arlington, Fleetwood, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Hatboro, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Simi Valley, Toronto, Vancouver, Longmont, Gainesville, and Burnaby.

The Will Call Window

On a semi-regular basis, we get a call from a customer saying, “I’m in Chicago and I think I’m right down the street from you. Can I just come pick up my order?” To which, of course, we always say yes. It’s a good way for locals to save a couple bucks on shipping, it’s nice to say hello to Jewelboxing customers, and it makes us feel almost like a real live brick and mortar. Well somehow this week, after one of these calls, it finally struck us that we should be making it easier for our customers to know that they can easily swing by our Chicago office and pick up their orders. So we’ve just added this option to the shopping cart:

 

If you’re local and close by, or just in town for a couple of days for meetings or a conference, and you’re looking to order, we hope this will provide a quick method to stop by, pick up, say hello, and get to Jewelboxing right away.

November 12, 2017 | Category: Blog

Taking the Leap

Who doesn’t love hearing that something you’ve built has improved someone’s day? We feel particularly close to any story of people switching over to Jewelboxing after finally getting fed up with the bland cases picked up from a local office supply store, largely because that was our experience, too, and it’s the reason for why we started the company in the first place. So we were happy to hear from photographer Scott McNamara who made the change and hasn’t looked back since. Here’s from Scott:

“As embarrassing as it is to admit, in my early days of wedding photography I would hand clients a beautiful set of Office Max DVDs, cleanly presented in clear jewel boxes. But wait…it gets better! The finishing touches were added with a Sharpie…yes…as in “Mary and Brian’s Wedding 2006.” I laugh at this tragedy now, as I have been using Jewelboxing cases for a year now.”

“I strive to custom design each set to match both the personality of the wedding and of the bride and groom. No two cases are alike; each is custom designed. I choose my favorite images and apply design elements that match those images.”

“For some of my clients, I have used the inside of the booklet as a place to document events for the DVDs themselves. This is usually a “Slideshow Guest list” where they can write the names and dates of the first people to view their slideshow. In addition, I add an area where the bride and groom can write their favorite images and why. In fifty years, these simple touches will hopefully help them relive the early days of their wedding.”

“Second to the wedding images, I get the most compliments on these cases. Clients are so excited to receive a surprise — custom designed cases that compliment the beauty of their wedding, and provide a taste of what’s to come. As a wedding photographer, they provide a solid platform with which to extend my brand. It’s a win-win for everyone!”

Thanks much to Scott for writing in and here’s to hoping there are bundles of old cases and sharpie pens destine for the rubbish bin for those in Dundee, Greenwich, Dallas, Minneapolis, Somerville, Chicago, Renton, Vancouver, Livonia, Brooklyn, Edgewater, Milford, Toronto, Murphysboro, Albuquerque, Washington DC, Wauatosa, New York, Napa, and Jarrettsville.

November 12, 2017 | Category: Blog

Herding the Archives

After four years and more than 200 entries to the Jewelboxing blog, we realized that the archives had grown a bit unruly and it was time to do some organizing. So we went through all of these hundreds of posts and assigned them all to categories, including things like Motion Graphics + Animation, Music projects, Weddings, and Tips we’ve put up over the years to make your whole Jewelboxing experience all the better. You’ll find the whole list of categories over there on the right. We figure this house cleaning will not only help us track things down in the archives, but will also let you more easily browse around and see what people are using Jewelboxing for in the specific areas you’re interested in. Happy reading!

Here’s to hoping we’ll soon be able to categorize all the project being put together in Shanghai, Boston, Charleston, London, Valley Center, Sao Paulo, Lemon Grove, Normal, San Francisco, Chicago, Whitehorse, Northfield, Columbus, Grand Rapids, Clinton Township, McAllen, New York, Ladera Ranch, Tucson, Lone Tree, and Berlin.

A Successful Audition

Maybe it stems from some residual childhood memory of being at the dinner table, but we’re firm believers of the “Try it, you’ll like it!” mantra. Around Jewelboxing HQ, we try and keep to that mindset outside of just what lands on our plates, giving the benefit of the doubt to everything from that new web app everyone’s talking about to seeing films we ordinarily wouldn’t be watching. So we were happy to hear from Jon Hall, who had a similar, “Try it, you’ll like it” experience with Jewelboxing. Here’s from Jon:

“I’m a graphic designer from Pittsburgh, PA. I operate JDH Ideas, a small design firm that works with web, print, and logos specifically. I have been using the Jewelboxing package system for a while now and I can’t believe how great they work. I’d been using old school, flat-black CD cases before and they were unsightly, flimsy, and generally just bad for business. I had a friend tell me about the Jewelboxing system, but I hesitated, thinking that the system was too good to be true. I finally ordered a pack, printed my CD, and never looked back at the old flimsy packages I had used before (well, actually, I use them as frisbees now). I really like how the packaging system gives my designs a permanent presence. It definitely ensures the materials don’t go unnoticed. One of the things I like most about them is how they start up so much conversation; it’s amazing. Everyone has been wowed by the design of the cases and so now I use them for all my new JDH Ideas clients, and for myself. They are just great for job hunting because they give you that extra edge that no one else has.”

Thanks much to Jon for taking the plunge and becoming a Jewelboxing believer. And here’s to hoping there are loads of new converts in Philadelphia, New York, Tulsa, Grandville, Wake Forest, Yardley, Palo Alto, Westlake Village, Aliso Viejo, Belton, Chicago, Washington DC, Sioux Falls, Venice, and Hong Kong.

November 12, 2017 | Category: Blog, Film

Past Preservation

It’s always cool when you learn something new about a friend. You think you know them pretty well, but then they surprise you with something they’ve never mentioned before, like “I won the state archery championship in high school” or “I just finished writing my first novel. It’s about bees, which I’ve been utterly fascinated by since childhood.” Such was the case with our good friend Andrew Huff, who has not only been a web ally over at Gaper’s Block, but has helped us over the years with projects of ours like Layer Tennis and The Show, as well as coming along with us on more than a couple of trips to the bar. But until recently, we didn’t know about a project he’d used Jewelboxing for and once we’d heard all the details, we asked him if he wouldn’t mind sharing them on the blog. He agreed and so here’s the whole story from Andrew himself:

“At Christmas in 2001, I brought a mini-casette recorder out to my grandparents’ house in Scottsdale, Arizona, to interview them about their youth. My grandmother was born in Italy and immigrated to the US when she was 8, passing through Ellis Island on her way to Chicago. My grandfather was born here, fought in the Pacific Theater during World War II, and came home to jobs ranging from running a small trucking firm to working for the City of Chicago’s Recorder of Deeds to owning a nightclub. He was the single best storyteller I’ve ever known, and their life together was so rich that I wanted to make sure at least part of it was recorded for posterity.

“I recorded about three hours of tape that Christmas. In between stories of my grandparents’ childhood in Chicago’s Little Italy, their courtship and my grandfather’s experiences in Guadal Canal and after, I also captured the rest of the family filling in details and asking questions. On one tape, my grandmother walks through the steps of making stuffed artichokes, and then we talk about life after marriage, the move from the Old Neighborhood, and grandpa’s trucking company and the uniform company he drove for for 20 years.

“In 2003, I brought my recorder with me again. This time, it was to record my grandfather one more time: he was in the last stages of lung cancer, so it was one last opportunity to ask him questions. He told me about the bar he ran, and about the move to Arizona in the early ’90s. Three weeks later, he passed away.

“The tapes sat in my office for several years, until my grandmother expressed interest in hearing them again. That spurred me to finally have them digitized. As I prepared the files for Grandma, I realized that the rest of the family would be interested in copies, too. So a grand Christmas present project was hatched.

“I knew right off the bat that I wanted to use Jewelboxing cases for the CDs. They’re beautiful presentation pieces, and the custom templates allowed me to easily create nicely designed inserts for them. I scanned photos from my mother and my collection, produced layouts in Photoshop using the templates, and printed them up. Unfortunately, I ran out of time before Christmas to actually burn the CDs. Fortunately, I was able to print the CD labels and take them with me, burning the discs and slapping on labels while listening to the recordings with my grandmother.

“The four-CD set turned out beautifully, and fits perfectly on the shelf alongside DVDs and books. My family loved the gift, of course. I’m looking forward to repeating the project with my dad’s side of the family this summer.”

Thanks very much to Andrew and here’s to hoping for a few surprises in Arlington, Austin, Cupertino, Orsay, Launceston, Lexington, Mountain View, Old Buckenham, Belfast, Wimbledon, Surbiton, Berkeley, Oslo, Guildford, Burbank, Chicago, Brooklyn, Montreal, Meerbusch, Great Neck, Richmond, Tonsberg, New York, Woburn, Elk Grove, London, Amsterdam, Seattle, Helsinki, Stockbridge, Bonita Springs, and Edmonton.

Shoot, Mix, Repeat

It makes it easy to get up in the morning and come in to Jewelboxing HQ thanks to people like Sara Flemming. Not only does she use our cases a ton, she has a blast doing it, and what more could you ask for in a customer? After running across some of her photos on Flickr, we dropped her a line asking if she wouldn’t mind telling us a little about her work and her experiences using Jewelboxing. Here’s her reply in full:

“For a few years now, I’ve been using the Jewelboxing system for two things: mix CDs (really!) and event photos.

“The Jewelboxing templates let me play designer just a little bit and, with the mix CDs, it’s fun matching the mood of the mix with the sleeve, insert, tray, and disc art. Being able to stack two CDs in the Standard case is a major plus; y’know, sometimes you just have a mix that’s too much for one disc! (:

“With the event photos, the templates give me a chance to showcase some of the photographs, previewing what’s on the disc for the recipient. The paper for all the inserts and even the disc labels take color really well, whether I decide to go with bright blue skies, fresh off the farm peaches, or deeply shadowed black and whites.

“After nearly a dozen projects (mostly event photos), the process of putting a disc together is quite quick: choose the photos, edit the event or mix information, print, punch out, and go! The whole system lets me present my work my own way, with full control from start to finish. I love that.”

Thanks much to Sara and here’s to hoping mixes are being made and events are being photographed in Portland, Somerville, McMinnville, New York, Chicago, Vancouver, Pittsburgh, Brooklyn, Palm Springs, Ann Arbor, Spring Hill, Cary, Palo Alto, Carnarvon, Washington DC, Ridgefield, Lincoln, Madison, Richmond, Great Barrington, Corvallis, Pasadena, El Segundo, Glasgow, San Diego, Bethlehem, Denver, Carouge and Zurich.

The Revolution Will Be Available on DVD

It must be the season for interesting, off-the-beaten-path Jewelboxing projects, as it seems like we’ve been receiving word of a lot of unique cases lately. So it is with Dean Cooper, a designer from the UK, about packaging a film he made about he and his friend’s trip to Cuba several years back. While we haven’t seen the film, based on Dean’s work with the case, we’re guessing that it’s more than equal in its skill and attention to detail (as an aside: Dean, can you make a poster out of the cover and tray art, so we can buy it and hang it on our wall?) Here’s a little about his process in putting the project together:

“I bought my Jewelboxing cases over a year ago but have only just got round to using them on a personal project that I’ve only just completed. A film of a trip to Cuba that me and a friend had in 2001 a lot of work went into editing the DVD and the Jewelboxing cases finish the project off beautifully. I found scans of a child’s sticker book produced just after the revolution on Flickr and used these 1960’s graphics as the basis for my design. I found the templates easy to use and the paper good quality.”

Here’s to hoping the revolution is beginning to take root in Des Plains, La Grange, Honolulu, Seattle, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Fayetteville, Naples, Burlington, White Plains, Denver, Fairfield, San Jose, Fort Worth, San Francisco, Oak Park, Cambridge, Irvine, North Vancouver, Redmond, Clio and Middletown.

The Hordes Demand Quality

It’s our feeling that it can only be a positive thing when an up-and-coming band is smart enough to invest in good design, instead of just having their friend take photos of them in an alley and ultimately ending up included on Rock and Roll Confidential’s less-than-prestigious list. And such good thinking certainly exists with the members of Genghis Tron who chose to work with designer Dominic Wilson in creating packaging for a documentary about the group’s recent tour. He chose to put the whole thing together using our Jewelboxing King cases, not only making the project look terrific, but rekindling his love of packaging design, which he recently shared with us, here:

“I shot the band Genghis Tron while on their Summer 2007 tour (Charlotte Harbor, FL. & Tampa, FL). Genghis Tron is a trio from Philadelphia, formed in 2004. The design uses photography that I shot during the performance. I had used the standard single DVD case for past DVDs and felt that it consistently lacked in quality and had recently begun researching for higher quality materials. The Jewelboxing system rejuvenated my interest in DVD package design and I was very impressed with its simplicity to assemble. I will certainly use your product for future DVD design.”

Thanks much to Dominic for dropping us a line and here’s to hoping there’s plenty of rejuvenation to be had in Minneapolis, Philadelphia, Chicago, Woodstock, Rockford, Washington DC, Silver Spring, St. Paul, Jersey Shore, Southlake, Naperville, Melrose, Cuahy, Lisle, Oxford, Gainsville, Los Angeles, Suwanee, Ottawa, New York, Des Moines, San Anselmo and Boca Raton.

November 12, 2017 | Category: Band, Blog

What Better Place for a Dragon Than In Your Civic?

Although Bryan and Dawson here at Jewelboxing HQ are scooter buffs, our motorized vehicle fandom doesn’t go too far beyond that. But that’s not to say we don’t really appreciate the whole car culture, with weekends spent buffing and polishing, regularly going to shows, and hunting for new items for souping up purposes. Quite the contrary (just replace “car” with “design stuff” and we’re pretty much the same group of people). And who couldn’t appreciate someone like Taylor Scheinuk, who not only writes about fully decked out Hondas, but was so in love with his own Civic, that he wanted the packaging he holds his music collection in to not diminish the pride he has in his car. And, so, like he said in a recent letter to us: “Enter Jewelboxing.” Here’s from Taylor:

“I own a 2006 Honda Civic LX 4-dr, which comes with an MP3 disc-reader standard. It’s all integrated and such into the dash, therefore I don’t want to touch it but I want all my music. Enter Jewelboxing. For a year or so I just had my discs in dingy slimline cases and I labeled them with, gasp, sharpie. I ran across your product online after I started doing direct-print discs with my (old) printer. I ordered a 30 pack of Standards and got to work. I had the color scheme in my head from the beginning (I’m a big fan of earthen, so brown and tan were in, in, in) and a piece of artwork a friend drew for me of the character from my book series. Some hunting around MSN Search Images got me the other bits I needed and I got to work.”

“Anyway, in the books, the main character eventually acquires a 2008 JDM Mugen Civic Type-R. That’s the vehicle featured all over the case.”

“I also did a mix disc as my aunt’s Christmas present this year and did a case too. I don’t have it with me right now but its excellent. Actually, I think that it may be better than my ‘Dragons in a Civic’ discs.”

“BTW: The reason why it’s ‘dragons‘ plural is b/c I’m drawing my own cover art with all the characters in it, its just taking a while.”

Here’s to hoping the rides are just as sweet in Butler, Providence, New York, Phoenix, Chicago, San Francisco, Pasadena, Highland Park, Washington DC, Huntersville, Boston, Atlanta, Norwich, Fallbrook, Paris, Minneapolis, Calgary, Madison, Savannah, New Rochelle, Columbus and Brooklyn.

Now In Our Template Arsenal: iWork Pages

As a follow-up to that last post, we recently put Bryan to work in developing Jewelboxing templates for Apple’s iWork Pages design program, and we’re happy to announce that they’re all finished up and available for download and use after making your Jewelboxing purchase. Although, like with the programs mentioned below in Design Software Alternatives, Pages doesn’t wield a ton of design muscle, we’d received a number of requests for the templates to be made available for it and we think you’ll find it’ll work well for whatever you have planned. Here are some brief notes Bryan sent along about the new templates:

  • If you follow the included instructions, a user puts the files in the right folder and they’ll show up automatically in the “templates” menu when you start to create a new file, which is kinda neat.
  • iWork is Mac-only and contains Pages, Keynote, and Numbers (analogous to Publisher, PowerPoint, and Excel). It costs $79, but there’s a 30-day free trial
  • If you like working in iPhoto and iMovie, it’s a particularly good choice because the interface is similar. If you use those programs, Pages will feel familiar.
November 12, 2017 | Category: Blog

Design Software Alternatives

Every once in a while, we get a call from someone interested in picking up a Jewelboxing system, but they’re tell us that they aren’t designers, they just have a one-off project they’re working on, or they just want to give it a try. And because of this, more often than not, they also mention to us that they don’t have any piece of high-end, image editing software. We’ve even gotten the question, “Can I use your templates in Word?” a few times. So while our templates are available in a variety of different formats and, even then, pretty adaptable to anything you want to try opening them, it’s pretty tough to be visually creative in a word processor and even harder to get things to print accurately. But we didn’t want to leave those users who don’t have a need for expensive design software behind, so we’ve done some digging and found these possible alternatives.

If you’re a Mac user, we’ve been big fans around the office of Pixelmator. It’s a powerful, inexpensive image editor that opens our Jewelboxing templates exactly as they should. And coming in at $59, it’s an absolute steal (sometimes it even appears at MacHeist, included with a bunch of other programs for just $49). If you’re running a Mac or PC, for just a little more money, you can always go straight to the leader of image editing, Adobe, for their Photoshop Elements software. It’s a stripped down version of their powerful Photoshop program, but if you’re not needing all of the features and capabilities of the original, Elements will open Jewelboxing templates and let you manipulate them just fine. And lastly, another program we’ve heard some good things about is Serif’s PhotoPlus X2, only available for PCs. It’s another more simplified image-editor with the ability to open several of the file formats our templates are available in.

There are likely dozens more available out there, with the internet creating something of a shareware boom. But whatever program you choose to work in, it’s important to know going in that anything you wind up using will take a little getting used to. Our templates are easy to understand and fairly simple to get right into, but they’re certainly of better quality than any of those “easy disc creator” programs available for a dollar at your local office supply store. So give yourself a little time to experiment, test out the waters with these programs by downloading a demo first if it’s available, and feel free to drop us a line any time you need a hand.

No matter the platform, here’s to hoping things are going well in Los Angeles, Redondo Beach, Venice, Brooklyn, Austin, Marietta, Lincolnton, Dallas, Aventura, Jersey City, Long Island City, Minneapolis, Covina, Washington DC, Rochester, Chicago, Beaverton, Santa Rosa, Florence, New York, Vancouver, Glendale and Oakton.

Blood, Sweat and Day-Long Renders

Between the lot of us here at Jewelboxing, we’ve worked on our fair share of animated projects, from putting together work for clients to carefully moving characters with our kids, frame by frame, in making yet another stop-motion Lego Star Wars epic. So we’d like to think that we understand animation and how much time, dedication and effort it takes. And because of that, when someone like Tommy Baldwin chooses to package his animation portfolio in Jewelboxing, we feel pretty honored that he’d entrust his years-in-the-making work within our cases. Here’s from Tommy:

“Well the project is a animation reel slash interactive portfolio that I have been working on for almost 2 years. It’s a simple narrative that displays my skills as an artist and an animator. The entire project from character development, to 3D modeling, texturing and animation was all done by me.”

“Originally I was only going to put the film on my site, but when I was finishing up the project a fellow coworker and designer told me about Jewelboxing. After poking around the site for awhile and seeing all the amazing results, I instantly knew that this was another way to show off my film and artwork. The layered design of the case really appealed to my 3D imagination. I loved that there was an empty chamber in the binder. I really thought about what to put in there before settling on a piece of copper with a common design element hammered into it. Another aspect of the case that I loved was all the visual space that I could fill up with my designs.”

“Most of all, in the world of animation, every book is judged by it’s cover, and I think that my cover really shows off what’s inside the case.”

Here’s to hoping everything is behaving as it should between every keyframe in New York, Edmond, Santa Cruz, Universal City, Hartford, Orlando, Roslyn, Tervuren, Alexandria, Troy Grove, San Francisco, Austin, Seattle, Milltown, Long Beach, O’Fallon, Brooklyn, Richmond, Corte Madera, Vancouver, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia and Edison.

Case Study 10: FontShop

With the release of the documentary Helvetica last year came not just a fine film, but the chance for thousands of people to have that rare opportunity to share their love of typography together, out in public no less, and to even drag a few friends along in an attempt to finally prove why type is so interesting. Stephen Coles of FontShop and Typographica (and everywhere else on the web), was one person who needed no convincing. Likely a fan of typography since birth, he lives and breathes x-heights and descenders. We were very fortunate to get the chance to talk with him about the release of FontShop’s newFontStars 2007: Best Type of the Year collection, which was beautifully packaged in Jewelboxing Standard cases.

Can you tell us a little bit about yourself and about FontShop?

Design legends Erik Spiekermann and Neville Brody founded FontShop in 1990, when the digital fonts were just starting to replace older technologies as the standard for typography. Other retailers have cropped up since then, but FontShop has always set themselves apart with their European aesthetic and rebellious attitude. I was honored when the company invited me in 2004 to join their San Francisco office. As a designer and writer, I have a hand in a lot of the visual and textual image of FontShop.com.

What about your other world, outside of FontShop, at Typographica. How did that get started? And do you do anything other than think and write about type?

My partner in bloggery, Joshua Lurie-Terrell, founded Typographica in 2002 as a sort of informal lounge in which to chat about type. Since then, it’s become more of a venue for long articles about new fonts and typography.

I also think and write about furniture of the ’60s at The Mid-Century Modernist

Before we get too far into this, and in the interest of helping even just one reader so they use the right definitions, what’s the difference between a typeface and a font?

Over the years, the two terms have become confused, but I’m on a crusade to reverse that. My main ammo will be this concise clarification by the astute type designer Mark Simonson: “The physical embodiment of letters, numbers, symbols, etc. is a font. When referring to the design of the collection (the way it looks) you call it a typeface.”

Part of your bio says, “Stephen is currently dating Motter Fermina after breaking off a long and passionate affair with FF Strada.” We found it funny to see someone else talking about type in that way because we do that same thing around here all the time. So what is it about typography that you think makes you/us swoon?

I’ve always been fascinated about the details of everyday life that escape the active attention or conscious scrutiny of the general public. This is type. Its subtle power influences everyone and they rarely realize it.

This is likely a touchy subject in your business, but because FontShop deals primarily in an all-electronic medium, how do you go about dealing with illegal file sharing? Theft seems like it deals in levels of respect, in some degree, so while someone might not feel any guilt, say downloading a Matchbox 20 album, they’ll still go out and spend money on the new Radiohead, because they respect them more. So lengthy tangent aside, is that something that FontShop tries to stay on top of by being helpful and knowledgeable and, in general, but perhaps most importantly, just coming across as a cool company that people want to support?

You will never stop piracy. But those who actually use fonts professionally soon realize that the advice and tech support that comes with a license is as valuable as the fonts themselves. Our expertise is worth the price of the font.

Of course, we also find that designers buy fonts because they respect the work of their colleagues. They believe type designers should be paid for their efforts just like they expect to be paid.

Can you tell us about the FontStars 2007: Best Type of the Year collection? How did you go about picking your favorites of the year?

Like a mediocre album, most font collections tend to have a couple of hits stuffed in with a bunch of duds. We found that even though the price-per-font is lower, designers don’t spring for these compilations because they simply won’t use most of the fonts on the CD. FontStars is unique in that every typeface is new and they aren’t limited to a single foundry. This gave us a lot more flexibility to choose the best new stuff. We made sure it was versatile and practical by throwing in more than one style of each text face and a broad range of display goodies that will meet most needs.

In short, we started by asking ourselves what new fonts we would most likely want to see in our font menu at the beginning of any project.

If you’re at liberty to say without hurting any feelings, were there any that you left out that just didn’t quite make the cut?

There were a lot of great releases last year. Our regret is that we couldn’t include more, but we wanted to keep the price down so it wasn’t out of the reach of smaller studios.

Any font that you’re particularly fond of in the collection? Have you used it for something recently and, if so, what for?

Buxom, old-timey scripts are huge right now, and I don’t think anyone has captured that era of retro jersey and cookie tin lettering as well as Leslie Cabarga with his Casey. It even comes with a set of the underline swashes that were so common in baseball logos of yore.

You’ve packaged FontStars in a Jewelboxing Standard case. Why did you decide to package it using Jewelboxing?

Being a font seller, we’re accustomed to digital goods. We never have to deal with inventory or storage. Using Jewelboxing cases allows us to produce each CD as its sold without sacrificing our professional image.

Any comments you have about the process of putting the cases together, from the design to their assembly?

Separating the perforations on a finished print is just so damn satisfying.

Finally, what’s in store in the world of typography for 2008?

I hope to see OpenType finally take over as the majority format for this year’s font sales. It’s like graduating to CDs from cassette tapes — it’s that much better than TrueType and PostScript.

A Very Tolva Christmas

If you read this blog with unusual devotion, you might recall this quote from 2006 in relation to John Tolva’s annual holiday party: “I’ve got to befriend this guy as soon as possible so I get an invite next year.” Well, we’re proud to announce that we did just that. Not only did we hit up a few neighborhood bars with John throughout 2007, we also went with him to Los Alamos, New Mexico to film a documentary. But, of course, the big moment of pride was when we got a much-coveted invite to his annual party. John has the full report here, if you’d like to read up on what it was like and what it takes to put together one of the best holiday parties around. What’s more, and how this all comes full circle to become relevant, is that John once again gave out holiday mix discs, packaged in Jewelboxing, complete with a mini-pencil in the case’s spine, allowing you to check off if you were naughty, nice or a little of both. And once more, they were a blast to pick up and bring home.

But he didn’t stop there. On his terrific site, Ascent Stage, he offered up a few pointers in making Jewelboxing a little easier to work withwhen you’re printing a bazillion of them and you’ve got to get them out in a hurry. Here’s a couple:

 

  • “It is much easier to label the CD’s once you’ve set them in the case on the spindle. This holds them still while you apply.”
  • “When ripping the perforations on the [Standard tray] sheet it is much easier to rip it latitudinally (the long side) first, then longitudinally.”
  • “Those crazy tiny diagonal perforations near the hinge? Cut them with a small pair of scissors. Much easier than ripping them.”
  • “Once you’ve printed the booklet inserts it is best to put stack them into 10 or 15 or so and weigh them down overnight with something heavy. This flattens them out so they sit in the tray better.”

 

There’s a few more beyond that, but we didn’t want John to get angry at us for swiping all the content off his site. It’s a great batch of info, so we highly encourage you to check it out before your next project.

Thanks again to John for the invitations and the great pointers and to those in Eureka, Brooklyn, Marina Del Ray, Atlanta, Henderson, Leamington Spa, West Covina, Des Moines, Evanston, Louisville, Savannah, San Francisco, Ventura, Crows Nest, Raleigh, St. Paul, New Kensington, Hatton, Jacksonville, Minneapolis, Alexandria, New York and Kalispell.

Case Study 9: Making Sense of Marcel Duchamp

We’re always excited when we get in samples of people’s work who have used Jewelboxing, but from time to time, something shows up that just goes above and beyond. That’s when we put together a Case Study, a special feature where we interview the creator of said “something special.” This time, we were fortunate enough to get a chance to talk with Andrew Staffordabout his fantastic Making Sense of Marcel Duchamp. Without further delay, let’s get right into it:

There doesn’t seem to be a commercial or institutional sponsor for Making Sense of Marcel Duchamp. Was it a commissioned work? Or an interest you had in Duchamp’s work that led to building the project? The “why” is a mystery.

How could I resist? Sometimes you have an idea, sometimes the idea has you. From its conception it seemed like a dream project, with a compelling unity of subject and media, content and form; and for me personally, a convergence of interests in Duchamp, information design, clear thinking, and plain language. Duchamp wanted people to participate in his art, what better way to demonstrate that than via user interactivity? The Large Glass is a diagram of a dynamic process, like a Rube Goldberg contraption, what better way to demonstrate that process than by animating it? I made it because I felt it would be an interesting and above all useful way to explore the ideas underlying Duchamp’s art. Plus, I thought it would be a lot of fun.

Was it? A lot of fun to make?

Sure, except when it was driving me crazy. Fortunately for my sanity, whenever I got tired of struggling with a Flash movie, I could give it a rest and go back to wrestling with the text. One thing’s for sure, it was never boring.

What was the hardest part?

Flash had a pretty steep learning curve. You know what, that wasn’t the hardest part, though. Let’s come back to that question later.

What was your research process in developing Understanding Duchamp?

The research process was an ordinary, time-tested one: look, read, ask, listen, think. You know the drill.

Was there something in particular that stands out that was just invaluable?

Not one thing, lots of things. If it was a flashback sequence it would have to start long ago with my friend Kate handing me a copy of Marcel Duchamp [d’Harnoncourt & McShine, 1973], saying “I think you’ll like this”… pilgrimages to MOMA, Tate Modern, the Philadelphia Museum of Art… Calvin Tomkins’ Duchamp: A Biography, which I cannot praise highly enough… a revelatory vision of The Large Glass in motion at the Weisman Art Museum… learning how to replicate the 3 Standard Stoppages… invaluable endless discussions with friends and colleagues… especially with my friend Nick Meriwether, who bravely volunteered to show me how to finish the text. That’s some of the highlights, anyway.

Did you learn anything new?

Lots. One thing that I got out of it was an appreciation of how some of Duchamp’s art invites physical interaction, and some of it invites personal interpretation, but both are pursuing the same objective: the participation of the observer, enticing lookers out of a passive mode into active engagement.

What was your design process?

I hope this doesn’t sound evasive or inarticulate, but it just evolved, stepwise, more or less organically. I don’t have a professional background in design, or to put it nicely my design education has been self-directed. For me, the design process is empirical and iterative, proceeding by trial-and-error and inevitably including more than a few false starts and cul-de-sacs along the way.

So was designing the website the hardest part?

There was always a way to go forward, at least one way, even if sometimes it meant backtracking later. For the most part, design decisions were guided by simply trying to do what the content demanded.

What about deciding on a structure? From the beginning did you decide that it had to be a timeline? What drew you to that instead of say, writing an essay or a book about Duchamp, or blocking it out in sections (i.e. 1. His Life, 2. His Art, 3. His Legacy)?

I tried out different ideas and didn’t settle on a timeline until the content was more than halfway done. What attracted me to the idea of a timeline was that the navigation device itself IS useful information: first, the numerous multiple miniatures, and second, their chronology. Each of the miniatures is repeated, larger, at the start of each chapter, which keeps people oriented as they click deeper into the content.

Beyond just the nuts and bolts of it, the timeline structure also seems like the best way of capturing Duchamp, since a lot of his work revolves around time, like with The Large Glass, where A leads to B leads to C and so on. Was that also a factor in the decision?

Not consciously, but I’m sure you’re right. Another reason it works is because Duchamp was not inclined to repeat himself, he kept pushing the envelope, so his output grew more diverse over time: paintings, objects, installations, machines. Obviously a row of stamp-sized canvases would be a lot less interesting to look at than spinning bicycle wheels and rotating optical disks.

There’s that famous essay by Walter Benjamin, The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, where he says that a piece of art loses its aura or mystique because it’s being reproduced again and again and becomes so familiar. Duchamp seemed to be commenting on that, in some degree, with his famous L.H.O.O.Q., some twenty years before Benjamin sat down to write about it. Do you have any thoughts about that?

Francis Naumann wrote a book, lovely to look at and not overly academic, that gave special attention to the conjunction of Duchamp’s art and Benjamin’s ideas. Did you know Duchamp and Benjamin met once? In spring of 1938, at a left bank café. Nothing of consequence came of it: Duchamp proudly showed Benjamin a small, hand-colored reproduction of Nude Descending a Staircase. In his diary Benjamin called it “breathtakingly beautiful.”

That demystifying of art that Benjamin talked about, is what you’re doing here similar to that? By reproducing and explaining in detail, not just on discs but for everyone with a web connection?

I hope so.

Your case, recreating Duchamp’s Large Glass on the very cover, is without a doubt one of the most impressive things we’ve ever seen done with Jewelboxing. Can you tell us a little about the process of creating it?

I wanted to make a small number of copies of Making Sense of Marcel Duchamp on CD, as gifts. When I ordered my first Jewelboxing 20-pack, I didn’t have any preconceived ideas for the case’s design. But in retrospect it seems so obvious, doesn’t it: The Large Glass meets Understanding Duchamp meets Jewelboxing equals this, how could it be otherwise? It’s such a sweet match-up of content and package, how could I resist? Trouble was, first, I couldn’t imagine how to make it; and second, when I did imagine how to make it, I didn’t know how to screenprint; and third, after I learned how to screenprint, I had to find a pigment and a substrate that would work together.

So, was making the cases the hardest part?

No, it took practice and plenty of experimentation, but it wasn’t the hardest part.

I wanted to ask about the slipcover you made to hold the case. Were those printed by you and if so, can you tell us a little about that?

The material was a basic cotton 120 lb. folio vellum, trimmed to 8.5″ wide to fit through my Epson 260. Make a template with cutting and creasing guides. Design as necessary. Print, score, cut, wrap, glue. Punch a semicircular notch at top. Spray the finished piece with a fixative.

So, what was the hardest part?

The hardest part turned out to be the task I thought I would be best at: writing the text.

What made it so difficult?

The challenge was to explain the essential ideas behind Duchamp’s art in precise, plain language without glossing over the hard questions it raises. The first difficulty was editorial, deciding what could be left out without diminishing the substance of those ideas. The second difficulty was compositional, finding clear, simple language to explain those ideas within the design-dictated constraint of a mere 100 words per panel. It’s safe to say that I underestimated the challenge of fitting such large ideas into such small containers. The final result was highly compressed prose, which I hope nonetheless reads like everyday language. Overall the text and visuals evolved in tandem, each informing the other, which I hope lends the whole thing an organic unity.

I don’t know if this question enters your head or not, but I assume that it must, once you get far enough down the line: do you think this would be something Marcel Duchamp would have appreciated? That he would have enjoyed reading through and participating in?

I like to think so. All we can be sure of is that he would have responded with detached bemusement. It was his usual response to… well, everything in the world, including his own iconoclastic imagination.

On the Topic of Police Officers and Bicycles

We’re big fans of the Byrd brothers, Aaron and Kevin. If you’re a regular Coudal reader, you’ve probably seen a lot of “via”s back to Byrdhouse, or links to some of their various projects and even right here on the Jewelboxing blog, like highlighting their film The Cycle Theory. So it was with great happiness that they decided to use Jewelboxing again to package their latest project, the delightfully absurd music video, Cops on Bikes. Here’s from the two of them:

On the project itself: “The video footage for Cops on Bikes was shot on a Sony still camera set to the ‘mpeg video’ option. We were hoping for a digital low-rent quality HD-Cams have trouble capturing. The stop animation stills were shot on a Canon 30D using 2 lenses, a 24-105mm and a crappy stereo lens. The slides are from Kevin’s analog collection. Aaron edited the video with Final Cut Pro. Kevin did some too. Aaron is Thriller 2.”

On using Jewelboxing: “We made the video with Jewelboxing in mind and knew the pictures and type treatment from the video and website would translate nicely. We went for an exploratory aspect with the case: all type on the outside, picture goodness on the inside to provide a nice contrast for one who opens it for the first time.”

“We thought it’d be nice to include headshots of the castmembers inside the dvd case usisng the photographic stills we used in the video. It was really exciting to see the media stretch across all platforms especially when transferring to something as slick as Jewelboxing.”

Kevin and Aaron were also kind enough to provide us with additional quotes, should we need them for this post, each of which we would feel sad if the world didn’t get a chance to read, so here they are:

From Aaron:
“Jewelboxing goes great with my beard, so I try to carry it around as an accessory whenever possible.”
“Girls tend to notice when you’re designing with Jewelboxing.”
“Where are the jewels? What a bunch of bull$%#*.”

From Kevin:
“I threw one at traffic once and it didnt break.”
“We sell them out our trunk at football games.”
“Aaron’s beard is real nice. I’m a lil’ jealous. I think Jewelboxing has done well for him.”

If that doesn’t sell you on the quality of the cases, nothing will. Thanks much to the Byrds for writing in and here’s to hoping that similar beard-related successes are being had in Alexandria, Brooklyn, Los Angeles, Sherman Oaks, New York, Boston, Ketchum, Durham, Lorton, Salt Lake City, Aliso Viejo, Edmonton, White Plains, Brampton, Lisle, Birmingham, Butler, Stanford, Basingstoke, Atlanta and Honolulu.

The Pleasure of the Padded Envelope

Is there anything as satisfying than finally shipping off the final version of a project for a client? You’ve worked long, hard hours, you’ve gone back and forth a million times, sometimes muttering the occasional unmentionable under your breath when you don’t necessarily agree with a decision, but that’s all in the past now. Whatever it is: it’s done, you’re happy and so is your client (hopefully it ends this way at least).

But even if your work exists entirely in ones and zeros, like with web design, it’s nice to have that “shipping it out” feeling of completion too, for all parties involved. Or so says Debbie Campbell of Red Kite Creative, who was kind enough to send us over some of her work, beautifully packaged in Jewelboxing Standards, and her reason why she sounds out finished websites on disc. Here’s from Debbie:

“I’m a web designer, and when I launch a project I always create a production CD for my client. I like to create a nice-looking package that reiterates both my ‘brand’ and my design skills, so the client is left with a tangible piece of my work to keep (and not just a digital website).”

“Jewelboxing is superior in every way to the regular CD cases I’d been using. I like the heavy weight of the plastic, and I really like the templating system. It’s easy to use and the quality and elegance of the finished product shows off my work nicely.”

Here’s to hoping trips to the post office are in the near future for those in Encinitas, Venice, Chicago, Poughkeepsie, Berkeley, Houston, Santa Monica, San Francisco, New York, Oakland, Decatur, Victoria, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Port Washington, Sydney, Winston-Salem, Tampa, Louisville, Granite City, Copenhagen, Williamsburg and Vancouver.